Quantcast Common Errors - P-8010172

 

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INSTRUMENT NAVIGATION
Common Errors
1. Overshooting arc and FAC due to insufficient lead.
2. Failure to descend and meet altitude restrictions for the various approach segments.
Remember to refer to the profile view.
STRAIGHT-IN- APPROACH
Introduction - A straight-in approach is an instrument approach where final approach is begun
without having executed a procedure turn. A straight-in procedure does not mean the approach
must be completed with a straight-in landing or made to straight-in landing minimums.
Generally, there are two basic differences in straight-in approaches--approaches which have the
IAF located on the final approach course and approaches which utilize intersections, TACAN
fixes, and other NAVAIDS for an IAF.
1. APPROACHES WHICH HAVE THE IAF LOCATED ON THE FAC: These
approaches do not normally depict a procedure turn. DME is often required to define the IAF,
step-down fixes, FAF and MAP. The TACAN RWY 14 approach at North Whiting (Figure 16)
is an example of this type of straight-in approach. A variation to this typical approach would be
a VOR approach utilizing intersections formed by radial cuts from another facility to provide an
IAF and FAF such as the VOR-C to Beaumont-Port Arthur/Jefferson Co. (Figure 17).
2. Procedure. The following procedures assume that you are at TROJN IAF, cleared for the
TACAN RWY 14 approach and at 3000'.
3. At the IAF:
a. TIME - Not applicable
NOTE: If the turn to intercept the final approach course is more than 90, a clearance may be
requested from ATC to execute an offset type maneuver to avoid having an excessive angle of
intercept. Clearance must be obtained from ATC. Clearance for the approach does not include
clearance for use of holding or maneuvering airspace.
b. TURN - Turn in the shortest direction to intercept the final approach course (124).
c. TRANSITION
(1) Descend to FAF altitude (1700')
(2) Check speed below 150 KIAS and transition to basic approach configuration.
(3) Complete the landing checklist. Normally you will want to perform your landing
checks 4-5 DME prior to the FAF.
7-26
INSTRUMENT DEPARTURES AND APPROACHES


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