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JOINT ADVANCED MULTI-ENGINE T-44A
course guidance will be used with very limited exceptions, and those exceptions will be set forth in the
procedure. These exceptions are: limited dead reckoning initial approach segments (with strict criteria
limitations for the IAP designer), course-reversals (procedure turns, etc.), and missed approach
procedures specifying a heading rather than course. Pilots should always attempt to fly as close to the
course centerline as possible. TERPs design criteria will provide maximum obstacle clearance
protection when the course centerline is maintained.
C. Typical Deviations.
This is a challenging program. You are expected to demonstrate a strong crosscheck and solid flying
skills, maneuvering the aircraft precisely while handling radio communications, managing crew
coordination and cockpit duties, and demonstrating procedural knowledge and good judgement in
emergency situations. Use the following as a guide to instructor expectations of what minimum
parameters students should be able to maintain by the end of the radio instrument phase of training:
Heading
+ 5 degrees (+ 10 degrees during emergencies/malfunctions)
+ 10 kts. (minimal airspeed loss during
Airspeed
emergencies/malfunctions)
Altitude
+ 100 feet (+ 150 feet during emergencies/malfunctions)
Arc
+ 1 DME (NATOPS "qualified" criteria, +0.5 DME desirable)
Approach Min Altitudes
MDA to +50 feet
Precision Glidepath
+ 1 dot
Localizer Course
+ 1 dot
TAC/VOR/NDB Course
+ 5 degrees
NOTE: The training syllabus requires students recognize approaching altitudes, MDA, and DH without the
standard 1000 and 100 feet advisory calls from the instructor.
D. Navigation Instruments.
The navigation system of the T-44 is composed of two identical VOR/LOC receivers, two marker
beacon receivers, an ADF receiver, and a TACAN/DME system. Two RMIs are installed, one for each
pilot, providing aircraft heading and navigational bearing data. There are also two HSIs installed, one
for each pilot. The HSI combines displays to provide a map-like presentation of the aircraft position;
the information displayed depends upon the navigation system selected by means of the respective HSI
select/annunciator switches. The ADI may display navigational information such as the flight director
pitch and bank command bars, and glide slope pointer. The altitude indicator, radio altimeter, and
magnetic compass should also be used when appropriate. Students are expected to refer to the T-44
NATOPS manual to become familiar with the characteristics of these instruments.
Notification of ATC. If loss of navigation capability or impairment of air/ground communications
capability is experienced in controlled airspace, a report shall be made including call sign, equipment
affected, degree to which IFR capabilities are impaired, and extent of assistance desired. When
simulated equipment malfunctions occur during the radio instruments stage, students should make this
report to the instructor.
Navigation Aids (NAVAIDs). Students should also familiarize themselves with the characteristics,
service volumes, etc. of the following NAVAIDS: VOR, TACAN, VORTAC, DME, ILS/LOC,
Marker Beacon, NDB, LDA, SDF, and GPS.
E. Pilot-In-Command/Aircrew Coordination.
During the radio instrument stage, the student will act as pilot-in-command (PIC) and the instructor
will act as the copilot (CP). It is very important for you to regard the instructor as your CP vice an
instructor. Your job, as the PIC, is to fly the aircraft, handle radio communications, manage cockpit
duties, and make decisions. To successfully accomplish this you must use all the resources available to
you, including the CP. Efficient prioritization and delegation of tasks is essential. During each flight,
4-2
RADIO INSTRUMENTS STAGE


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