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JOINT ADVANCED MULTI-ENGINE T-44A
305.
Night Flying Environment. With the exception of lighting, virtually all airborne procedures are identical
to daytime operations. You must be constantly vigilant of your position, instruments, and other traffic.
Maintain a continuous scan. Never fixate on one particular light or stare at dark areas for an extended
period. Bring your scan back into the cockpit systematically. Avoid large rates of descent near the surface,
particularly when descending over water or in mountainous terrain. Recommend the RADALT (Radio
Altimeter) be set at 1000' (or 200' below altitude if operating below 1200') for operations outside of a
traffic/instrument pattern. This will provide an indication of inadvertent descent. It may be helpful to set
the RADALT bug at 50 or 100 in the pattern.
Night Traffic Pattern. Crosswind corrections are not as easy to anticipate due to a lack of visual cues.
306.
Fly a normal pattern. Concentrate on looking down the entire length of the runway to avoid angling. It is
extremely important to hit pattern checkpoints to prevent having to make gross corrections. The most
common night landing error is failing to flare sufficiently. Altitude cues are not readily apparent and the
flare must be anticipated. Do not fixate on a spot in front of the nose. Sight toward the end of the runway
and land with a visual picture of the centerline between your legs. Do not fixate inside the aircraft on
rollout, especially during touch and go's. Keep your scan outside and maintain centerline. The OBS may
shine a flashlight on the trim panel (at IP's discretion) to assist in resetting trim during touch and go
operations.
307.
Night Emergencies. Handle night emergencies the same manner as daytime with several exceptions.
(1)
Scan is paramount. You must maintain control of the aircraft while executing procedures. During
night or instrument conditions, direct the CP to activate switches (generator, etc.) outside your
normal scan pattern. Altitude loss/airspeed deviations may be more difficult to detect at night. On
landing, be sure to scan well down the runway in order to detect yaw.
(2)
Darkness in the cockpit may make it more difficult to read the checklist and verify switch positions.
A more deliberate approach to emergency procedures is required.
(3)
It is easy to become disoriented at night. If you think you are not sure of your position, confess and
take immediate action. Climb if appropriate to clear terrain or get better reception. Conserve fuel;
consult bingo/max range charts when time allows. Verify NAVAIDs and then check DME and tail
of the needle. If still unsure, call ATC and ask for help, squawking 7700 or as assigned. Comply
with advice and instructions received.
Landing and Return To Parking. After landing, turn off strobes and landing lights as soon as
308.
practicable. Comply with standard daytime procedures and return to the line. The PAC should direct the
PNAC to complete items that might divert attention from outside the aircraft. Energize ice lights prior to
turning into the parking spot. Immediately after initiating the turn, secure landing/taxi lights to prevent
blinding the taxi director.
NIGHT FAMILIARIZATION STAGE
3-3


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