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MANUAL OF NAVAL PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
e. Cleaning hermetically sealed containers of food of visible soil
before opening;
f. Protecting food containers that are received packaged together in a
case or overwrap from cuts when the case or overwrap is opened;
g. Clearly distinguishing damaged, spoiled, or recalled food being
held in the food establishment;
h. Separating fruits and vegetables, before they are washed.
3-2.4 Food Storage Containers, Labeled with Common Name
of the Food
Containers holding food or food ingredients shall be labeled with the
common name of the food.  Containers holding food that can be readily and
unmistakably recognized (e.g., dry pasta, bread) need not be identified.
3-2.5 Pasteurized Eggs, Substitute for Shell Eggs for
Certain Recipes and Populations
Pasteurized liquid, frozen, or dry eggs or egg products shall be
substituted for shell eggs in the preparation of:
a. Foods such as caesar salad dressing, hollandaise or bearnaise
sauce, mayonnaise, eggnog, ice cream, and egg-fortified beverages.
b. Eggs for a highly immunocompromised or otherwise susceptible
population.
3-2.6 Washing Fruits and Vegetables
a. Raw fruits and vegetables shall be thoroughly washed in water to
remove soil and other contaminants before being cut, combined with other
ingredients, cooked, served, or offered for human consumption in ready-to-
eat form.
b. Vegetables of uncertain origin and those purchased in foreign
countries and/or suspected of being contaminated with pathogenic organisms
must be chemically disinfected by immersion for at least 15 minutes in a
100 ppm Free Available Chlorine(FAC) solution or 30 minutes in a 50 ppm FAC
solution (or other approved solution) and thoroughly rinsed with potable
water before being cooked or served. A 100 ppm chlorine solution can be
made by adding 3 tablespoons of 5% sodium hypochlorite to 5 gallons of
water; use 1 tablespoons for a 50 ppm solution. Head items such as
lettuce, cabbage, celery, etc., must be broken apart before disinfection.
3-2.7 Ice used as Exterior Coolant is Prohibited from Reuse
Ice may not be used as food after it has been used as a medium for cooling
50


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