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CHAPTER 1
AIR FORCE T-38 TRACK INTERMEDIATES
The Squadron Commander (CC)
The Squadron commander is equivalent to the Commanding Officer and is responsible for the
Squadron.
The Operations Officer (DO)
The Operations Officer (Ops O)is the second in command in an Air Force squadron, there is no
"XO." The Ops O is responsible for the flying operations in the squadron and is usually the
"hammer" for things like late takeoffs. The Ops O is an O-5.
Assistant Ops O (ADO)
ADOs are usually Majors and are senior people in the squadron; they report to the Ops O and
will sit the Duty Desk during flying ops or will be the SOF.
Your Flight Commander
The squadron is divided into flights. Each flight has a Flight Commander who is responsible
for their students and IPs; you work for this person.
Check Flight
Check Flight is similar to the Standardization Department here at Whiting. The difference is,
Check Flight IPs only give checkrides to students. When your checkride comes up, you will go
to Check Flight with all your flying publications, and report to your IP in a military manner to
receive your checkride. The checkpilot is an observer and will not instruct you whatsoever. If
the checkpilot has to take the aircraft during the sortie then your checkride is probably over; you
have likely failed. Air Force checkrides are conducted in a very formal manner, you will not ask
for guidance from the checkpilot unless it is a safety of flight issue. It is better if you just
disregard their existence in the cockpit except for challenge response items in the checklist.
Life Support
Your life support equipment will be stored in the squadron. You will have to be fitted for a G-
suit and an Air Force helmet. As soon as you arrive at Vance, report to Life Support to get these
items issued to you. Get your helmet "pour" completed as soon as possible. This takes about
three hours. It is time well spent because you will have a helmet that is form fitted to your
cranium. In the T-38 world, you will step to the jet with your parachute on your back with your
helmet bag, G-suit, and pubs. Get the Life Support technicians to show you how to preflight
your helmet and parachute. You will need to do it before every flight. This might be your first
time around Air Force enlisted personnel, and like their Navy counterparts, they are extremely
sharp and highly motivated. They are looking up to you as an officer to set the example, so
conduct yourself accordingly; act professionally and look sharp.
1-6 INTRODUCTION TO USAF T-38 TRACK INTERMEDIATES


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