Quantcast Table A.2.1. In-Flight Distress Signals

 

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AIR FORCE T-38 TRACK INTERMEDIATES
APPENDIX A
Intercepting Signals
The intercepting aircraft positions itself in front of
and usually to the left of the intercepted aircraft and
rocks its wings. This is a signal that the interceptor
wishes the other aircraft to follow it. A responding
irregular flashing of all available lights in this case
indicates distress.
Radio Failure
Tap microphone or earphone of helmet and signal as
appropriate:
a. Receive Failure: With palm of hand over the ear
position, move hand forward and backward.
b. Transmitter Failure: With palm of hand toward
and in front of the face, move hand up and down.
Radio Inoperative Landing (No Assist Aircraft Fly aircraft along the side of the landing runway,
Available)
1000 feet above the field elevation, rocking wings
until reaching end of the runway.
Turn to
downwind and check the tower or mobile control for
green light on base leg and final approach for
landing clearance.
System Failures (HEFOE System)
Clench fist and hold it at top of canopy, then hold up
the required number of fingers to denote which
system is involved (see a through e below). If the
clenched fist signal is seen, but no finger signal is
seen or the intercepting pilot is unable to understand
the signal given, the pilot will assume the aircraft in
distress has one or more systems inoperable and
should proceed with caution.
The receiving pilot acknowledges the signal by
repeating it:
a.
Hydraulic one finger
b.
Electrical two fingers
c.
Fuel three fingers
d.
Oxygen four fingers
e.
Engine five fingers
Note: For multi-engine aircraft, point to the side,
left or right, that corresponds with the engine
failure.
NOTES:
1. For use only when radio is inoperative or not available.
2. Day visual signals.
A-7


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