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AIR FORCE T-38 TRACK INTERMEDIATES
CHAPTER 7
708.
SR ROUTES
SR routes, or slow speed routes, are flown at or below 1500 feet AGL at speeds of 250 knots or
less. AP/1B prohibits high speed aircraft from flying slow speed routes. For slow speed routes,
VFR is required and the entry point fix/radial/distance is required for the entry point only.
Now these AP/1B routes are just one way of flying a low level. You could fly VFR virtually
anywhere if you desired. You could fly in unrestricted airspace, a MOA, or a restricted area if
you coordinated clearance to enter. Either way, the TPC is the map of choice. So, go get your
map and start plotting.
709.
DRAWING YOUR ROUTE
The AP/1B will list corridor centerline points and width. Note that the corridor centerline is
not necessarily the intended route of flight, it, when used with the route width, defines the
boundary you must stay within when selecting turn/check points. In the Tactical community, we
use felt tip markers to draw the route using black for the route line and information "doghouses."
Plot your turn/checkpoints on the map and connect them from the starting point to the end point.
Use the symbology in the appendix example chart. Put timing tick marks on the course line at
one-minute intervals. A good technique is to number every other minute mark on opposite sides
of the route of flight (this reduces clutter) continuously through to the target (eliminating the
need to re-start the clock at each point). Leg time between points is used for ease of fuel
calculations and is placed in the "doghouse" near the turn point. Next, draw the "doghouses" on
the map next to the turnpoint and pointing towards the next turn point. Fill in the information in
the doghouses as shown on Figure 1.
A couple of other things that need to be done that may not be on your Jet Log are Route Abort
Altitude (RAA), Bingo fuel and Joker fuel. We already talked about Bingo and Joker fuels; just
put them on the map. Bingo fuel should be prominent and in red and written next to the furthest
turn point on the route. Continuation fuel for each point should be put under the bottom of the
doghouse in black. So much for fuels, how about RAA?
Route Abort Altitude is calculated to give you a safe "hip pocket" altitude you could climb to if
you inadvertently enter IMC. In the tactical community, RAA is also used if a threat reaction
has taken you off the "black line" and you are trying to get your SA back. Calculate RAA by
finding the highest obstacle along your route line of flight. Round this altitude up to the nearest
100 feet and then add 500 feet. This is your RAA. Write it in large red letters on your map.
710.
FLYING THE LOW LEVEL
Now that you have completed the planning, it is time to fly the plan. Low level navigation is a
step-by-step process using dead reckoning and pilotage to fly from a known position to an
unknown position. Proper pilotage requires a CLOCK TO MAP TO GROUND sequence: Note
the time elapsed, find a feature on the map that is at your time elapsed or slightly in front of the
aircraft, and then find that feature on the ground. This sequence allows you to progress from one
known point to another. Do not be tempted to find a feature on the ground and try to match it to
T-38 LOW LEVEL NAVIGATION 7-5


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