Quantcast The Anti-G Straining Maneuver (AGSM) Demonstration

 

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CHAPTER 2
AIR FORCE T-38 TRACK INTERMEDIATES
a. Procedure
(1)  Enter the working area at around 9500 MSL with 850 ft-lbs. Do not begin this
exercise until approaching the middle of the area.
(2)  Begin a shallow descent (no more than 5-7 degrees) and allow the airspeed to
build to approximately 190 to 200 knots.
(3)  With airspeed, roll with rudder and aileron and set the lift vector on or slightly
below the horizon, advance the power to 1015 torque, begin your AGSM and pull smoothly to
3.5 Gs and maintain. You want to sustain 3.5 Gs and 190-200 knots for the entire 180 degrees.
(4)  Rollout with rudder and aileron on heading but maintain your airspeed for the
next G-turn or command a rejoin if in formation.
(5)  Repeat the procedure for the second G-awareness turn, but this time maintain 4
Gs and 190-200 knots throughout the turn.
b. Common Errors
(1)  Over-banking the wings.  You only need to bank just over 90 degrees to
maintain your energy throughout the turn. Maintain G and airspeed, no more, no less.
(2)  Pulsing the stick with every exchange of air during AGSM. Your AGSM and
stick inputs should be independent of each other; keep a uniform nose tracking rate versus the
horizon throughout the turn.
(3)  Over-G the aircraft or yourself. Do not try to manhandle the airplane into 4 Gs;
the T-34 has a lot of elevator authority and will over-G in a second. Roll, set the lift vector and
pull smoothly to 4 Gs and maintain. Do not pull faster than you can handle either; the idea is
not to over-G yourself and have the IP save you; remember, this is a single seat world.
202.
THE ANTI-G STRAINING MANEUVER (AGSM) DEMONSTRATION
Combat aviation is a very mental and very physical job, and pulling Gs is part and parcel to
using an aircraft as a weapon. Third and fourth generation fighters can pull Gs at high onset
rates and maintain these Gs at levels that can easily exceed the pilot's capability. Survival in the
high G environment is going to be a function of the most fundamental weapon the fighter pilot
has to combat the effects of Gs on the body, the AGSM. Air to Air combat is going to entail not
just pulling a high G turn but to also sustain this level of G throughout the turn and this is what
the AGSM demonstration is meant to show-- how important the AGSM is for not just the initial
pull but throughout the high G episode. NATOPS limits us to 4.5 positive Gs, which is not much
more than a roller coaster, but if you do not work on the basics now, when you get to aircraft that
can pull, 6, 7, up to 9 Gs, you are going to be in for a big surprise when you find out your AGSM
is lacking (it may not be that big of a surprise, because you will be asleep with a weak AGSM!).
The IP is going to take the aircraft and setup just like you did for the G-awareness exercise, then,
after clearing in the direction of turn, the IP is going to roll and set 4.0 Gs and maintain this for
about three 360-degree turns. You need to anticipate the Gs coming on by simultaneously
flexing your legs like a leg press, tightening your stomach muscles and taking in a big breath
while holding it against a closed glottis. You can use the "hook" maneuver if that works for you,
but the Air Force does not teach this. The idea is the same; you are trying to trap a higher level
2-2 T-38 PRECISION AEROBATICS


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