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CHAPTER 2
AIR FORCE T-38 TRACK INTERMEDIATES
(6)  Allow the nose to fall through the opposite horizon, adjusting the amount of aft
stick pressure to maintain a constant pitch rate. Fly the aircraft's nose along the section line,
relaxing right rudder pressure as airspeed is quickly regained.
(7)  Continue to relax right rudder pressure as the airspeed increases in the dive and
smoothly increase aft stick pressure as necessary to maintain a constant pitch rate. The recovery
will again require approximately 3.5 Gs, so remember to resume the AGSM. Quickly scan the
altimeter during recovery in order to return to straight and level flight at approximately the same
altitude and airspeed, but offset 270E from the original heading, tracking along your section
line.
(8)  Commence the next "leaf" (if applicable) as described above. As you recover
from the even-numbered maneuvers, you will fly perpendicular (vice parallel) across your
section line.
d. Common Errors
(1)  Failure to check and report the altitude prior to entry. It is hard to recover on
the same altitude when you do not know what it is.
(2)  Failure to raise the nose high enough during the first 45E of turn. Generally,
this will result in a correspondingly nose low attitude and proportionally high airspeed when
recovery is made.
(3)  Improperly coordinating the rate of roll with the rate of pitch. An insufficient
roll rate will result in an overshoot of the intended reference point, while an excessive roll rate
will result in an undershoot.
(4)  Failure to maintain balanced flight. Too much or too little rudder will produce
essentially the same results as too fast or too slow a rate of roll, respectively, on the first half of
the maneuver. Poor rudder control is easily detected by checking the alignment of the nose and
the section line. Remember that the required rudder input varies as airspeed varies. Almost
constant rudder adjustment will be required during the last half of the maneuver also.
(5)  Relaxing too much backstick pressure while passing through the inverted
position at the top of the loop. This will result in a "floating" sensation. Remember to maintain
some positive G-loading throughout the entire maneuver. Conversely, failure to relax sufficient
backstick pressure over the top will result in excessive angle of attack and rudder shakers. If
this occurs, relax the backstick pressure slightly.
(6)  Failure to initiate the pull-out soon enough during the second half of the loop.
This results in excessive airspeed and recovery below the initial altitude.
(7)  Failing to scan ahead for the reference point and/or section line and thereby
losing orientation.
2-6 T-38 PRECISION AEROBATICS


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