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CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION TO USAF T-38 TRACK INTERMEDIATES
100.
GENERAL
This Flight Training Instruction (FTI) is a Naval Air Training Command directive in which the
Chief of Naval Air Training (CNATRA) publishes information and instructions relative to all
Instructors and Student Pilots operating the T-34C aircraft in USAF T-38 Track Intermediate
flying.
101.
GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED IN THIS SYLLABUS
Angle-Off (AO): The angular difference between the longitudinal axes of two aircraft.
Aspect Angle (AA): The angle measured from the tail of Lead's aircraft to the position of the
Wingman; can be expressed in degrees or clock position. The tail of Lead's aircraft is an aspect
of 0, the nose is 18 (180 degrees). Any perpendicular position of the Lead is a nine aspect (left
wingtip, right wingtip, top of canopy, center of wings underneath).
Blind: No visual contact with friendly aircraft (aircraft in our formation); opposite of term
"visual."
"Bingo" Fuel: Prebriefed fuel state which allows aircraft to return to base or alternate, if
required, using preplanned recovery parameters and arriving with normal recovery fuel.
Closed: Successive takeoffs and landings/low approaches where the aircraft does not exit the
landing pattern.
Closure: Overtake created by airspeed or angular advantage; can be positive or negative.
Corner Velocity: The minimum speed at which an aircraft can attain maximum allowable G.
In the T-34C this is approximately 135 KIAS for positive G. This is where you will be able to
get maximum turn rate and minimum turn radius on the aircraft.
FCIF:  Flight Crew Information File is a file of cards containing each squadron pilot's name.
Every pilot has their own FCIF card; signing off the last entry in the FCIF book acknowledges
you have read the latest entry. This is similar to the student read file except a little different in
that you cannot fly or perform Runway Supervisory Unit (RSU) duties [USAF Wheels-Watch]
until the card is up to date; if you have not signed off the last FCIF, you will not get an airplane.
Variations include the SARF (Safety Aircrew Read File) and the ARF (Aircrew Readfile) or PRF
(Pilot Read File).
INTRODUCTION TO USAF T-38 TRACK INTERMEDIATES 1-1


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