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APPENDIX G
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING LOW-LEVEL MAPS
Attached you will find three simulated VR routes which are similar to the types of military
training routes you will fly in the T-38. You will be expected to prepare a jet log (plan for 180
knots ground speed) and a map for the sortie. Follow FTI guidance and the instructions below.
1. Determine the route you want to fly based on weather or food preference (Tallahassee and
Tuscaloosa have good barbeque, New Orleans has good food at Hammond).
2. Get the appropriate sectional charts from the mission planning room or the NATOPS office.
3. Plot, in pencil, the corridor points (A, B, C, etc) using the latitude and longitude coordinates
provided. These are not your turn points; they only define the corridor of the low level.
4. Draw the route corridor using the route width with a dark marker. Once the route is drawn
on the map, you can label the corridor points (A, B, C, etc) outside of the actual corridor (see
example).
5. Select turn points within the route corridor. The first point should be visually significant so
that you can start your timing. The last point should be the target you want to destroy. The point
prior to the target will be the initial point or IP. Turn points are labeled with a circle, the IP is
labeled with a square, and the target is labeled with a triangle (see example).
6. Connect the turn points with a line.
7. Prepare a jet log for the route based on 180 knots of ground speed. You can use estimated
winds from the weather shop to calculate your indicated airspeeds.
8. Your route will be based on total time. In other words, if your route takes 1+10 (or 1 hour
and 10 minutes), you should arrive at your target 1 hour and 10 minutes after hitting the first
point. Put total timing tick marks on the map every 1 minute starting from the first point (see
example).
9. Compute the continuation fuel; the minimum fuel required at each point to continue the low
level and arrive at your destination with the appropriate reserves (100 lbs per tank or 200 lbs
total).
10. Add dog houses to the route with heading, indicated airspeed, leg time, and continuation fuel.
11. Determine the route abort altitude (RAA) based on the highest obstacle or terrain within 5
NM of your route of flight. Write the RAA on the chart and put a red square around the highest
obstacle/terrain that the RAA is based on. Also, circle in red any other obstacles along your
route of flight that may be a factor.
12. Determine a Bingo fuel to an appropriate divert field and write it on the map and line up
card. Your Joker fuel is the continuation fuel.
13. Make copies of your map and jet log for all members of the formation (black and white
copies are acceptable for the IPs).
14. Arrive at the brief with copies of the map, line up cards, NOTAMS, Weather, and a fuel
packet.
G-1


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