Quantcast Tail-Chase Exercise - P-3570099

 

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T-34C PRIMARY FORMATION FLIGHT TRAINING
CHAPTER EIGHT
Keys to Success
1.
Lead should conduct the first turn into Wing to better enable Dash-2 to firmly establish
their position.
2.
If Wing is out of position, Lead should give a turn into instead of a turn away.
3.
Lead should avoid airspeed in excess of 200 KIAS in order to preserve energy.
4.
Wing needs to anticipate turns and use lead, lag, or pure pursuit to maintain position inside
of leads turn.
806. TAIL-CHASE EXERCISE
Introduction. Tail-chase is probably the most challenging maneuver in the Cruise formation
syllabus. Tail-chase incorporates everything that you have learned about bearing lines, pursuit
curves, and energy management and uses these tools in three dimensions. The goal of this
exercise is to demonstrate the effects of lead, lag and pure pursuit on nose-to-tail distance. The
goal for Lead is to provide a smooth platform so that Wing can maintain position. Lead will
execute a series of maneuvers, maintaining airspeed between 100 to 200 KIAS. The goal for
Wing is to use lead, lag, pure pursuit, and power as required to maintain the aircraft 600 to 800
feet behind Lead's six o'clock position.
Collision Avoidance. Each aircrew member shares the responsibility for collision avoidance.
The wingman should always be "visual" on Lead so he retains primary responsibility for
deconfliction between the aircraft. This responsibility transfers to the flight lead if the wingman
becomes blind or is placed in a blind position during maneuvering.
Lead Considerations. Lead is responsible for maneuvering the formation within the working
area and at an energy level that is conducive to high angle of bank maneuvering. The concepts
below will help to ensure success.
1.
Begin in the middle of the airspace with good energy. Tail-chase requires a lot of vertical
maneuvering. Using a ground reference in the middle of the area or along the area boundary is
not required but will help you to stay orientated.
2.
As Lead, never pull more than 3 Gs, never get slower than 100 KIAS nor faster than 200
KIAS. This will preserve energy and allow Dash-2 to maintain position.
3.
Lead should monitor Wing during the maneuvers. If Dash-2 is out of position, Lead should
execute the next maneuver into Wing to provide better angles to get back into position.
4.
Tail Chase may not be accomplished below 5000 feet AGL. If either aircraft descends
below 5000 feet AGL, a "KNOCK-IT-OFF" shall be called.
CRUISE MANEUVERING 8-7


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