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T-34C PRIMARY FORMATION FLIGHT TRAINING
CHAPTER SIX
settings, in close proximity to the ground. Once airborne and
established on departure, the Flight Leader will use the radios to
reset the formation as desired.
Common Errors
1.
Lead putting Wing on the wrong side of the runway.
2.
Lead forgetting brake release signal.
3.
Early and abrupt rotations by Lead.
4.
Wing allowing aircraft to fall too far aft.
5.
Both pilots forgetting to accomplish the last items of the Takeoff Checklist.
602. SECTION TAKEOFF ABORTS
If either aircraft aborts the takeoff after brake release, maintain lateral control of the aircraft and
do not cross the centerline of the runway. The abort is easily recognizable because a rapid line
of sight or large relative motion will develop between the aborting and nonaborting aircraft. The
nonaborting aircraft will get immediate separation by checking max power and executing an
individual takeoff. For this reason, Wing must maintain a minimum of 10 feet of wingtip
clearance when lining up on the runway and throughout the takeoff. The aborting aircraft will
execute the NATOPS abort procedures while maintaining his side of the runway. If Lead needs
the section to abort, he will transmit "[tac call sign], abort, abort, abort." In this case, both
aircraft will abort, maintaining their own side of the runway.
603. IFR PARADE TURN EXERCISE
Flying Wing when going through weather can be a real eye-opener if you have never done it
before. IFR parade flying has to be tempered with extreme caution due to several factors:
1.
Wing's propeller prevents Wing from getting too close to Lead.
2.
Flying through clouds may involve turbulence, which could cause a prop-strike if Wing is
flying too close to Lead.
3.
Wing could potentially lose sight of Lead in IMC, which may be disorienting for Wing.
IFR parade utilizes the "welded wing" concept. The wingman's position on Lead remains the
same as in level flight, regardless if turning into or away. This provides the wingman a familiar
point of reference to avoid possible disorientation. IFR parade is very much a teamwork concept
between both aircrews. Lead must focus on being a smooth platform while Wing must be
aggressive about maintaining the parade position. If in actual IMC conditions and Lead is
smooth enough, Dash-2 may not realize he is in a turn unless they cross-reference the attitude
SECTION TAKEOFFS AND APPROACHES/IFR OPERATIONS 6-5


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