Quantcast Departure - P-3570033

 

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T-34C PRIMARY FORMATION FLIGHT TRAINING
CHAPTER THREE
Keys to Success
1.
If unstable, back out and stabilize relative to Lead, then move back in.
2.
Maintain stepdown and bearing.
3.
Always strive to be in position or working towards position in small increments.
4.
Keep relative motion zero; scan Lead's entire aircraft in addition to parade references.
5.
If Wing needs to look away from Lead (radio channel changes, fuel and instrument
checks), Wing should use quick deliberate glances.
307. DEPARTURE
Lead. Lead is responsible for getting the section to and from the area safely by complying with
local course rules, responding to radio calls, and clearing for the formation. Once Wing is in the
parade position on the starboard side, Lead will smoothly set power as required (850 ft-lbs
maximum) and continue the departure. Lead should make all power adjustments at a slow
constant rate and use the parade rate of roll for turns. As the section approaches the level off
altitude for the departure, Lead will initiate a smooth level off approximately 200 feet prior to the
desired level off altitude. Lead will smoothly establish 150 KIAS (approximately 630 ft-lbs)
entering the working area.
Wing. After takeoff, the Wingman's primary goal is to get into position as expeditiously and
safely as possible. Once established in position, Wing will always work to maintain the parade
position. Lead should be smooth enough during the course rules departure that any transitions
(climbs, power additions/reductions, level-offs, turns, and rollouts) are easy to follow. Wing
should maintain situational awareness through the departure to help anticipate transitions and
maintain position.
Common Errors
Lead
1.
Lack of Wingman consideration. Lead being too abrupt with controls and power.
2.
Excessive Wingman consideration. Lead allowing Wingman consideration to cause
mistakes on the departure (headings, altitudes, radio calls, etc.).
3.
Poor radio procedures. Lead forgetting to switch or check in the Wingman.
SECTION PARADE 3-15


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