Quantcast Slip Defensive Positioning

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Slip Defensive Positioning
Back | Up | Next

Click here for thousands of PDF manuals

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Logistics
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
   
   

 



T-34C OUT-OF-CONTROL FLIGHT
CHAPTER TWO
c.
As the student enters the stall you should shadow them on the controls. It is not
uncommon for the student to raise the nose after beginning the recovery and enter a
secondary stall. If this occurs at the point when the power is spooling up, you could
depart to the left due to torque effect. You can solve this early by verbally telling
them to relax some back stick.
d.
It is also not uncommon for the student to use the left rudder when recovering from
an approach turn stall to the left. Point out that the student may enter the left rudder
incorrectly on recovery from an approach turn stall to the right also; in either case, the
left rudder is always incorrect to counter the torque. You can prevent this by
shadowing the controls with your right foot over, not on, the right rudder pedal; you
can prevent the SNA inadvertent left rudder input with an artificial stop.
Additionally, note that it does not require full rudder to depart the aircraft. With full
rudder input at a stalled or near stalled condition, you need to be concerned about an
approach turn spin with the gear and flaps down.
3.
Slip Defensive Positioning
The slip is a terrific way to lose excessive altitude while maintaining airspeed and ground track;
however, with a misapplied rudder or inattention to airspeed, the student could depart or stall the
aircraft. Some of the defense techniques are:
a.
Pre-brief the student to say, "Wing down, top rudder" as they are lowering the wing
to enter the slip. You should shadow them on the controls as they enter.
b.
Make sure the rudder (slip) is taken out before the student tries to change directions
and lower the other wing and swap rudders. The rudder should be taken out smoothly
and entered smoothly. If the student is not taking out the rudder before making turns,
they may inadvertently enter a skid. Again, shadow the controls.
c.
If a student is changing rudders and changing the wing in a rapid or rough manner,
they could depart the aircraft due to a rapid increase in yaw rate (Figure 1-4). Due to
the out-of-balanced flight condition, the stall speed will be higher. In either case,
shadow the controls.
4.
Emergency Landing Pattern Defensive Positioning
With regard to the Emergency Landing Pattern (ELP), the previous slip defensive techniques
apply. In addition, here are other ELP considerations. Some of the defense techniques are:
a.
When simulating a power loss emergency, once you say "Simulated" and pull the
power, the student still has the controls (stick and PCL), but you are the only one who
will move the PCL to a SIMULATED FTHR condition (205 ft-lbs). Leave your hand
near the PCL while guarding the Condition Lever to ensure the student does not pull it.
2-12 UNUSUAL ATTITUDES AND OUT-OF-CONTROL FLIGHT


Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

Integrated Publishing, Inc.