Quantcast Out-of-Control Recognition

 

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T-34C OUT-OF-CONTROL FLIGHT
CHAPTER ONE
After performing the first four steps of NATOPS OCF Recovery Procedure and you confirm
your aircraft is in an inverted spin, accomplish recovery in the following manner:
1.
Gear/Flaps - Check UP,
2.
Rudder - Full OPPOSITE turn needle,
3.
Stick - FORWARD OF NEUTRAL (erect spin) - NEUTRAL (inverted spin),
4.
Controls - Neutralize when rotation stops, and
5.
Recover from unusual attitude.
The stick will "float" near the full forward position, so you will have to apply a pull force of
about 30 lbs. to place the stick in the neutral position. The aircraft will recover to a steep,
inverted, nosedown unusual attitude.
As stated earlier, although they are not encountered frequently, inverted spins can be extremely
disorienting!
103. OUT-OF-CONTROL RECOGNITION
Loss of control of an aircraft can be a confusing and disorienting experience. Sound familiar? A
rapid analysis of the specific phase of OCF is essential for executing a prompt recovery. Visual
and "seat of the pants" cues are not sufficient to differentiate among the Departure, PSG, and
Incipient Spin or Steady-State Spin phases.
Even the seemingly obvious determination of whether or not the aircraft is in an erect or inverted
attitude may not always be possible through sensory cues. In an erect spin, the airplane may spin
in a relatively nose-low attitude with a high rate of roll, or it may spin in a flat attitude with a
high yaw but very little roll rate. In a Steady-State Spin, the flight path is vertical (i.e., straight
down). The axis of the spin or the center of the spin rotation is also straight down.
In a steep, nosedown attitude, the axis of rotation lies forward; in extreme cases, the axis may be
forward of the entire aircraft! As the nose rises to a flatter attitude, the axis of rotation moves
aft. If it moves behind the cockpit and if at the same time a high yaw rate is present, the pilot
will experience high transverse (eyeballs out) "G" forces. These transverse "G" forces may be
interpreted by the pilot as negative "G's" (Figure 1-11).
1-10 INTRODUCTIONS AND SPINS


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