Quantcast Out-Of-Control Flight Recovery - P-3540028

 

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T-34C OUT-OF-CONTROL FLIGHT
CHAPTER TWO
Once this check is complete, the IUT will again take the controls, reconfirm the spin direction by
noting the turn needle, and recover the aircraft by utilizing the Normal Erect Spin Recovery
Procedures. Minimum entry altitude for the Control Release Spin maneuver is 9000 feet AGL.
2.
Procedures
a.
Perform the procedures to enter a normal erect spin in either direction.
b.
After two turns, release the controls and conduct a systematic check of cockpit
indications and control positions.
c.
Once the cockpit check is complete, take the controls and reconfirm spin direction by
referencing the turn needle.
d.
Apply full rudder opposite the turn needle.
e.
Position the stick forward of neutral (ailerons neutral).
f.
Neutralize the controls as rotation stops.
g.
Recover from the ensuing unusual attitude.
204. OUT-OF-CONTROL FLIGHT RECOVERY
Recovery from PSG and Incipient Spins (including the reversal phase of the Progressive Spin) is
accomplished through prompt, positive neutralization of flight controls in all axes. Patience and
the maintenance of neutral controls are vital, since an immediate aircraft response to neutralizing
may not be apparent to the pilot. In addition, cycling the controls or applying anti-spin controls
prematurely can aggravate aircraft motions and prevent recovery. Wrestling with the aircraft in a
gyration or Incipient Spin may be innately satisfying, but it is very likely to delay or prevent
recovery and increase altitude loss without accomplishing any positive results.
An important distinction must be made between stalls and OCF. A stall precedes OCF, but a
stall per se is not OCF. A stall by itself is mild and is associated with the partial or apparent
complete loss of control authority in one axis (almost exclusively the lateral axis as the nose
drops). OCF includes a rapid uncommanded motion that accompanies or follows a stall as well
as a more complete loss of control effectiveness. Stall recovery techniques are not appropriate
for OCF and should be abandoned once it has been determined the aircraft has departed
controlled flight. For example, an Approach Turn Stall (ATS) that exhibits the normal
characteristic of the nose pitch-down should be recovered using the stall recovery technique. If,
however, during the stall or recovery, the aircraft begins a rapid and uncommanded roll, the stall
recovery technique should be abandoned and out-of-control recovery should be initiated (neutral
controls, etc.).
Just as important as the distinction between stalls and OCF, is the distinction between Steady-
State Spins and other categories of OCF. Recovery from a Steady-State Spin by maintaining
neutral controls is uncertain. Consequently, after neutralizing the flight controls, if cockpit
2-4 UNUSUAL ATTITUDES AND OUT-OF-CONTROL FLIGHT


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