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T-34C OUT-OF-CONTROL FLIGHT
CHAPTER TWO
209. DEFENSIVE POSITIONING
It is essential to teach unusual attitudes and OCF in order to more adequately prepare fleet
aviators for the rigorous flight regimes with which they will constantly be dealing with as
primary flight instructors. Additionally, it is as equally important to teach instructors the
preventative measures concept of "defensive positioning".
The following is a discussion of maneuvers Student Aviator's commonly perform and sometimes
perform incorrectly. This section is an amplification of common student errors found in P-330
(Contact FTI) and is intended to provide the new instructor with some knowledge gained by
others through experience.
1.
Spin Defensive Positioning
The spin is a terrific confidence builder for a new aviator and is a relatively simple maneuver to
perform, but if not entered correctly or if the student is slow to put in the proper inputs, you as
the instructor may end up in a flight regime you did not intend to enter. Some of the defensive
techniques are:
a.
As the student rolls out after completing the clearing turn, look at his head to see if he
is looking out the opposite direction of the last 90 of the clearing turn. This may be
an early indication they are going to spin the wrong way. You could either confirm
the direction verbally or wait to see they are leading the rudder in the correct
direction. If they are leading with the wrong rudder, confirm verbally. Look for the
early signs.
b.
As the instructor, you must constantly be vigilant of other traffic; try to look and
make sure it is clear around your aircraft in both directions. If at the stall the student
puts in the wrong full rudder, either let him continue if you have cleared the area and
debrief it after you have recovered, or recover immediately by taking the controls and
performing OCF Procedures. You do not want confusion in the cockpit at the stall
and subsequent cycling of the rudder pedals.
c.
As the nose of the aircraft comes up, you, as the instructor, should be done looking
outside. You should be shadowing the controls and beginning your scan looking for
stalled AOA (altitude, AOA, airspeed, and turn needle). If you do not see the correct
control inputs going in, go ahead, put them in, and debrief it later. This does not
mean you are flying the maneuver, but you are going to make sure it is executed
correctly. Silence the horn.
d.
The spin entry should be very methodical and deliberate; it should not be a slow
"milked" entry with not enough back stick to stall the AOA. If you see the proper
control inputs are not put in, apply them in a timely manner to avoid a spiral or just
entering an unusual attitude.
2-10 UNUSUAL ATTITUDES AND OUT-OF-CONTROL FLIGHT


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