Quantcast Approach Turn Stall Defensive Positioning

 

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CHAPTER TWO
T-34C OUT-OF-CONTROL FLIGHT
e.
After you are in the spin, confirmed by stalled AOA and stable airspeed (80 - 100
knots), shadow the controls, block the aileron input, and hover your boot over the
rudder input. Now we are looking for a correct recovery, ensure that as you are
shadowing, you do not block the rudder as the student is trying to put in the correct
recovery rudder and ensure the stick is put in the proper position.
f.
Upon spin recovery, the student may leave the recovery rudder in too long; emphasize
that the controls go to neutral once rotation stops.
2.
Approach Turn Stall Defensive Positioning
The ATS is a relatively benign maneuver and as an instructor, you will do many of them;
however, due to this maneuver's normally benign nature, it can catch you by surprise. You may
end up in an OCF scenario you did not intend to be in if the student does something unexpected.
The purpose of this instruction is not to reiterate what is already covered in the Contact FTI, but
to prepare the instructor for the unexpected. With that said, this excerpt from the Contact FTI
bears reiteration with regard to the ATS.
NOTE
Stalls should be practiced to the maximum extent to build
confidence and proficiency. In all cases, however, departure from
controlled flight shall be avoided. Instructional time should be
used to practice successful recovery techniques rather than test the
student's ability to recover from uncontrolled flight.
As an instructor, you will have the opportunity to recover from the "botched" ATS under an
approved OCF syllabus; however, the SNA is being taught to recover from an ATS that may
save their life should this occur in the Landing Pattern. We are not teaching them to recover this
maneuver from OCF. Therefore, here is what to expect when you least expect it. Some of the
defense techniques are:
a.
During the clearing turn, tell the student you are going hot mic and turn it on. This is
a small item, but may become very important to you if your student departs the
aircraft unexpectedly and you are trying to reach the ICS switch to tell him you have
controls, while at the same time trying to raise the flaps.
b.
During the descent after the clearing turn, check the student's trim. This can be done
a couple of different ways. Have the student show his hands or put your left hand on
the trim wheels after power reduction to feel the trim inputs. This helps the student
learn the correct trim inputs for the pattern, and it will affect your departure from
controlled flight if they are incorrectly trimmed and enter a secondary stall or input
incorrect rudder.
UNUSUAL ATTITUDES AND OUT-OF-CONTROL FLIGHT 2-11


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