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T-34C INSTRUMENTS
CHAPTER THREE
3.
Common Errors
a.
Allowing nose to pitch up when lowering the gear entering BAC.
b.
Improper attitude control during Missed Approach. Hold approximately 68 degrees
nose up and 24 AOB. Not holding 68 will cause an increase or decrease in
airspeed. Do not rotate over 8 nose up.
c.
Not anticipating heading or altitude lead upon level off from Missed Approach.
d.
Exceeding climb airspeed during Missed Approach climbout.
e.
Turning prior to establishing 120 knots.
f.
Trying to raise the gear with greater than 120 knots.
312.
UNUSUAL ATTITUDES (FULL PANEL)
An unusual attitude is a flight condition involving an extreme attitude, airspeed, or combination
of the two. Confusion or carelessness of the pilot, excessively turbulent air, or inadvertent
entrance into a cloud formation are some examples of how an aircraft may enter an unusual
attitude.
The miniature airplane presentation on the attitude gyro is the most rapid method to picture the
aircraft attitude. In addition to the attitude gyro, the airspeed indicator will furnish indications of
nose attitude as well as elevator stick pressures to be anticipated, while the turn needle and RMI
will give indications of wing position.
Recoveries must be timely and sequentially effected to prevent dangerously extreme attitudes.
For example, in a nose low, airspeed high and increasing attitude there is a tendency to pull back
stick to stop the altimeter unwinding, thus tightening the turn (GRAVEYARD SPIRAL). In nose
high attitudes, there is a danger of stall if the recovery is not timely.
To determine the attitude of the aircraft and the proper recovery to be used, the pilot should
immediately check the attitude gyro, which provides an instantaneous picture of the aircraft
attitude. Since the gyro can precess, or in extremely rare cases, tumble, we must verify the
attitude gyro prior to a recovery. The nose attitude should be quickly crosschecked by referring
to the airspeed indicator; confirm wing attitude on the turn needle as you return toward the gyro
to effect a recovery.
There are three different types of unusual attitudes taught in the Basic Instrument Stage. They
are the nose low attitude, nose high attitude, and extreme nose high attitude.
BASIC INSTRUMENTS FLIGHT PROCEDURES 3-31


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