Quantcast T-34C Navigation Systems

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: T-34C Navigation Systems
Back | Up | Next

Click here for thousands of PDF manuals

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Logistics
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
   
   

 



CHAPTER FOUR
T-34C INSTRUMENTS CHG 1
2.
Maintaining a constant heading (other than directly to or from a NAVAID), the tail of the
needle rises and the head falls (assuming no­wind conditions).
402.
T­34C NAVIGATION SYSTEMS
This section will provide an overview of the navigation equipment installed in the T­34C. It is not
within the scope of this manual to address these systems in detail. It is strongly suggested that you
consult the indicated references for specific information.
The T­34C is equipped with three navigation systems. The VOR (OMNI) receives its signal
from VOR ground stations operating in the VHF range. The TACAN receives its signal from
TACAN ground stations operating in the UHF range. Often both stations are co­located in
"VORTAC" facilities. The third system is the KLN900 GPS, which receives its signals from
globally positioned satellites and is covered in Chapter Seven.
First you will learn VOR navigation and later be introduced to TACAN; the main difference
being Distance Measuring Equipment (DME) associated with the TACAN allows precise
determination of your position utilizing a single NAVAID. Lastly, you will be introduced to
GPS navigation.
403.
VHF OMNIDIRECTIONAL RANGE (VOR)
Reference: T­34C NATOPS, Chapter 19, VOR Receiver (VIR­30A); NIFM Part V, "VHF
Omnidirectional Range (VOR);" AIM Chapter 1, Section 1, "VHF Omnidirectional Range."
The VOR is a navigation system which operates in the VHF frequency range (108.00 to 117.95
MHz). VOR course information is not affected by lightning or other types of severe weather;
however, reception is limited by line of sight. Normal reception range is 40­45 NM at 1000 feet
AGL and increases with altitude. VOR provides azimuth information only, with accuracy being
generally plus or minus 1º.
Most VORs are equipped for voice transmission on the VOR frequency. The only positive
method of identifying a VOR is by its Morse Code identification or the recorded automatic voice
identification.
Example: digitized/recorded voice speaking "Crestview VOR" alternating with Morse Code
identifier.
Never rely solely on identification from voice transmissions by the Flight Service Station (FSS)
or approach control facility, because many FSS remotely operate several omni ranges.
The T­34C is equipped with the VIR­30A VOR receiver. This receiver is located in the
avionics compartment. It is controlled by a receiver control box which is part of the
multifunction panel in each cockpit (Figure 4­3). VOR information is displayed on the VOR
needle (single bar) of the RMI (Figure 4­6).
4-4 INTRODUCTION TO RADIO INSTRUMENTS


Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
6230 Stone Rd, Unit Q Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 493-0744
Google +