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CHAPTER SIX
T-34C INSTRUMENTS
630.
PRECISION APPROACH RADAR (PAR) APPROACH
Reference: AIM, Chapter 5; NIFM, Chapter 24, "Radar Approaches."
1.
Amplification ­ The precision approach radar (PAR) approach uses radar vice aircraft
equipment to vector the aircraft to a position for landing during conditions of low ceiling and/or
poor visibility. You have been introduced to vectoring procedures during radar vectors to final
approach course. During the radar vector procedure, the approach controller used his/her radar
capability to direct your aircraft onto a segment of a standard Instrument Approach Procedure.
During a radar approach, the controller will direct your aircraft to a position from which you can
safely land.
Radar approaches fall into two classes:
a.
Airport Surveillance Radar (ASR) approaches which provide course and range
information only and are thus non­precision approaches (these use an MDA).
b.
PAR approaches provide course, range, and glideslope information and can thus be
flown to lower minimums using a Decision Height (DH).
This chapter will address PARs only. The procedures for ASRs are similar but will not be fully
discussed until Chapter Seven.
2.
Planning for the PAR
Preflight ­ Radar instrument approach minimums are published in the front of FLIP
Terminal Instrument Approach Procedures (approach plates) and in the minimum section of
approach plates if they have radar approaches available. Published information includes the
decision height, weather minimums, and glideslope angle. From glideslope angle and
groundspeed the pilot can determine the rate of descent required to maintain glideslope on
final using the rate of descent table, also in the back of the approach plates.
Familiarize yourself with this information as part of your preflight planning when a radar
approach (PAR or ASR) is available at your destination or alternate.
Figure 6­72 is a sample of the section in the approach plates that contains information on
radar approaches. For the purposes of illustration, we will consider the PAR approach to
RWY 5 at Mayport NS.
a.
Beside the heading of RADAR is a list of frequencies on which your approach may
be used. The x's following the frequencies indicate that the radar site has the
capability to work on that frequency but does not monitor it continuously. (Additional
notes will be found in the Radio/NAV remarks section of the IFR supplement.)
RADIO INSTRUMENT FLIGHT PROCEDURES 6-117


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