Quantcast Night Prelight

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Night Prelight
Back | Up | Next

Click here for thousands of PDF manuals

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Logistics
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
   
   

 



CHAPTER TWO
T-34C INSTRUMENTS
6.
Turn Needle/Balance Ball
7.
8.
Slave the clock sweep second hand
Deviations in cockpit instrument readings will be taken into account during maneuver
evaluations.
NOTE
Once the clocks are slaved, do not reset them for any BI maneuvers.
205.
REAR COCKPIT BAILOUT
Refer to T34C NATOPS. In the case of any actual emergency, immediately stow the
instrument hood.
206.
NIGHT PREFLIGHT
Flight equipment as prescribed by NATOPS and local SOP will be worn or carried on all night
flights. Additionally, an operating flashlight and a clear visor will be included as part of the
required equipment. A preflight inspection will be conducted prior to each night flight in
accordance with NATOPS. A white lens flashlight will be used to conduct the preflight during
darkness. All exterior and cockpit lights will be checked during the preflight.
207.
REAR COCKPIT LIGHTING
Refer to T34C NATOPS.
208.
USE OF OXYGEN
Refer to T34C NATOPS for oxygen system description and use. Prior to every instrument
flight, a thorough preflight of the oxygen system and your mask will be conducted. Your
instructor will show you how to properly adjust the mask and connect the Inter Communication
System/Ultra High Frequency (ICS/UHF) radio cords. Since BI flights are conducted above
10,000 feet, improper use or a malfunction of the oxygen system could result in hypoxia or
hyperventilation.
1.
Hypoxia
A reduction in the level of oxygen available to the body and its cells causes the physiological
condition of hypoxia. If the pilot is physically fit and there are no fumes in the cockpit, this
condition will probably never occur below 10,000 feet. Mechanically, it can be caused by a
leaking oxygen system, an inoperative mask, or a faulty regulator. Although no two individuals
are identical in objectively recognizable symptoms, the onset of hypoxia may be seen as a
2-12 BASIC INSTRUMENTS GENERAL PROCEDURES


Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

Integrated Publishing, Inc.