Quantcast Low Altitude Instrument Approach

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Low Altitude Instrument Approach
Back | Up | Next

Click here for thousands of PDF manuals

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Logistics
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
   
   

 



CHAPTER SIX
T-34C INSTRUMENTS
623.
LOW ALTITUDE INSTRUMENT APPROACH
Reference: AIM Chapter 5, NIFM Part VI, "Instrument Approaches," and T­34C NATOPS Part
VI, Chapter 17, "Instrument Flight Procedures."
1.
Amplification ­ An instrument approach enables an aircraft to transition from instrument
flight conditions to a visual landing while providing terrain clearance and separation from other
aircraft. There are a number of Low Altitude Instrument Approach Procedures that may be
executed with the navigation equipment in the T­34C to transition from the enroute environment
to final approach for landing. These include Procedure Turn, Teardrop, Holding Pattern in lieu of
Procedure Turn, Straight­In, and Arc and Radial combination approaches (sometimes referred to
as Procedure Tracks) that use VOR, DME, TACAN, or a combination thereof to complete the
approach. Radar vectors to final approach course is an additional procedure that may be applied
to any of the above approaches. These approaches use different methods to provide the same
result ­­ to position the aircraft safely on final approach.
2.
Procedure (Common to all approaches)
a.
Familiarize yourself with the destination Instrument Approach Procedures prior to
departure. (See Appendix B for recommended approach plate review technique.)
Ensure they are compatible with aircraft navigational aids. Check forecast weather
conditions against weather minimums listed on the approach plate and choose a
suitable alternate.
b.
Enroute, review the Approach Procedures again. Update weather and obtain clearance
for the desired approach. The T­34C is considered a single­piloted aircraft.
Therefore, you may not commence an instrument approach if either ceiling or
visibility is reported to be below minimums. In this case, you must request clearance
to your alternate, or clearance for an approach with acceptable weather minimums.
c.
Once cleared for the approach, fly the groundtrack as depicted and comply with all
altitude restrictions.
NOTE
When cleared for an approach prior to the IAF, do not descend
below last assigned altitude unless:
i.
A new altitude is assigned by ATC.
ii.
The aircraft is established on a published route.
For example: If operating on an airway, i.e., V­198 inbound to CEW at 5000
(see Figure 6­47), and cleared for the CEW VOR­A approach, a descent to the
MEA (3000) or IAF altitude (2200) whichever is higher, could be initiated prior
to the IAF.
6-76 RADIO INSTRUMENT FLIGHT PROCEDURES


Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

Integrated Publishing, Inc.