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T-34C INSTRUMENTS
CHAPTER TWO
noticeable pale and blue tinge (cyanosis) of the fingernail beds and face, numbness, tingling
sensations, and/or a feeling of euphoria. Hypoxia may also cause hyperventilation.
2.
Hyperventilation
Hyperventilation is simply breathing too quickly, too deeply, or both. It can occur at any
altitude, with or without a supply of supplemental oxygen. Hyperventilation results from
exhaling too rapidly, thus upsetting the carbon dioxide balance in the blood. It is most likely to
occur in stress situations that tend to produce anxiety and/or apprehension. The first symptoms
may be a tingling in the fingers and toes that will get progressively worse until spasms occur in
these areas. If no preventive action is taken, these symptoms will be followed by extreme
tensing of all muscles, soon followed by a temporary loss of consciousness. It is not unusual for
hypoxia to result in hyperventilation. The symptoms of hypoxia and hyperventilation are very
similar, and the treatment for both conditions is the same.
a.
Select emergency position with the diluter lever.
b.
Inform your instructor.
c.
Slow breathing rate by counting to four or five between breaths.
d.
Descend to 10,000 feet or below.
e.
Check oxygen equipment.
209.
INSTRUMENT, GAS, OXYGEN REPORT (IGO)
This report will be performed at least every 20 minutes (preferably after each maneuver) during
all flights. This report is the same as in the Contact Stage with the exception of the position
report which is replaced by reporting oxygen pressure and blinker operation.
210.
ASSUMING CONTROL OF THE AIRCRAFT
When assuming control of the aircraft on dual flights, utilize the same procedures as in Contact
Stage. In the event of suspected ICS failure, stow the instrument hood so visual communication
can be established.
211.
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
During the brief your instructor will ask you about specific Emergency Procedures. These are
listed for each flight in the Multi-Service Pilot Training System (MPTS). Just as in Contact
Stage, you are responsible for knowing the procedures for each flight. The NATOPS Manual
and the NATOPS Pocket Checklist have all of the procedures listed.
BASIC INSTRUMENTS GENERAL PROCEDURES 2-13


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