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T-34C INSTRUMENTS
CHAPTER EIGHT
Request NOTAM information from the FSS. If the information available is not sufficient,
contact the nearest suitable military base.
6.
High Altitudes ­ It is possible that one or more of your flights will be flown at the upper
altitude extreme of the Victor Airway structure or on Jet Routes. There are certain factors that
vary with altitude. Among them are:
a.
You may see lower indicated airspeeds than you are used to at lower altitudes.
However, the difference between indicated and true airspeed is greater at higher
altitudes. Use your navigation computer to determine true airspeed for the existing
IAS, pressure altitude and outside air temperature.
b.
You may reach ITT limitations prior to reaching the max torque setting, something
not normally experienced at lower altitudes.
c.
Remember that when flying at and above 18,000 feet MSL, altitudes are referred to as
flight levels (FL180 = 18,000 feet) and should be referred to as such on flight plans.
Refer to the FIH Section B (Altimeter Changeover Procedures) to determine lowest
useable Flight Level. Always use a standard altimeter setting of 29.92 when
operating at or above 18,000 feet.
7.
Entry Into Terminal Area ­ Prepare for the approach to your destination well in advance
of your arrival in the terminal area. 40 to 50 miles out is a good time to start preparations.
Review the approaches serving your destination. Also, review Missed Approach Procedures and
the route you will fly to your alternate in the event this is necessary.
If you are expecting a PAR or ASR to your destination, do not fail to employ your NAVAIDS.
If a TACAN exists at your destination, tune it in as an aid to orientation during the GCA. If
there is not a NAVAID at the field, tune the nearest suitable ones that will aid in orientation or
executing Missed Approach.
8.
Finally, Instrument Navigtion is a great exposure to the "real world" of aviation. It is
important to not focus solely on the FTI as in the past stages, but incorporate information from
all available sources, both military and civilian. For example: OPNAV 3710, AIM, FIH, GP,
and Area Planning (AP). In addition, review Chapter 3 of NATOPS for servicing, local SOPs,
Wing Stan Notes, and cross­country instructions. All of these resources contain information,
which you will need to be familiar with in order to have a successful event.
CROSS COUNTRY PLANNING 8-3


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