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CHAPTER THREE CHG 2
T-34C INSTRUMENTS
c.
Not allowing the VSI and altimeter to stabilize prior to making the next nose correction.
d.
Chasing the altimeter and VSI.
e.
Forgetting to reset normal cruise power if you had previously reduced to idle during nose
low recovery.
315.
DIRECT TO A VOR OR TACAN
1.
TUNE and identify the station.
a.
Ensure that you have avionics control (Inform the IP if you intend to TAKE
avionics command). Set the desired frequency or channel. If using TACAN,
ensure you are tuned to the "X" band of the desired channel.
b.
Place the appropriate audio switch forward on the audio panel until the station is
positively identified, then turn the switch off.
NOTE
A TACAN station identification occurs only every 35 seconds. If
you do not know the Morse identification, ask your instructor.
c.
Ensure the appropriate NAVAID is selected using the TOGGLE switch below the
altimeter.
2.
TURN to place the single needle (VOR) or double needle (TACAN) under the heading
index of the RMI.
3.
TWIST the Omni Bearing Selector knob in the CDI (labeled OBS) until the CDI centers
with a white flag under "TO" in the TO/FROM indicator. The course under the index in the CDI
with the CDI centered is the current course direct to the station.
4.
TALK: Report course to your instructor. The maneuver is now complete.
316.
VERTIGO DEMONSTRATION
Vertigo can be defined simply as a body sensation which tells the aviator that his aircraft is in a
particular attitude, when the aircraft is actually in an entirely different position relative to the
horizon. This false sensation is derived from a number of sources: the inner ear and vestibular
stimulation, for example.
Vertigo usually does not occur when a pilot has visual reference to the horizon, or at least, the
pilot pays little attention to his body feelings, since his sight simply overcomes them.
Disorientation occurs when there is no reference to the horizon; however, this does not
necessarily limit vertigo to flying in the clouds. It can occur when the aircraft is VFR, on a day
when there are large buildups, when flying above a layer of clouds, when flying in and out of a
3-44 BASIC INSTRUMENTS FLIGHT PROCEDURES


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