Quantcast VFR Wide or Straight in Approach

 

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CHAPTER SEVEN
T-34C CONTACT
3.
Procedures
a.
Ensure you are number one upwind.
b.
Aircraft shall be above 300 feet AGL with flaps up.
c.
Transmit departure call, "(Field name), crash/RDO/tower, (call sign), number one
upwind, departing."
d.
Add power to max allowable (if it had been reduced previously to level off.)
e.
Check airspeed below 120 KIAS.
f.
Raise landing gear and turn landing lights off.
g.
Climb to departure altitude (in most cases, this will be the pattern altitude), level off,
then accelerate to 170 KIAS.
h.
Climb when clear of pattern.
i.
Comply with SOP/Course Rules for departure.
4.
Common Errors
a.
Not ensuring you are number one.
b.
Forgetting departure call.
c.
Not raising gear.
d.
Raising gear above 120 KIAS.
e.
Climbing through pattern altitude, i.e., no level-off.
f.
Not retrimming.
g.
Deviating from course rules.
712.
VFR WIDE OR STRAIGHT-IN APPROACH
1.
Description.  A wide or straight-in approach may be used at either military or civil
airfields when use of the "break" (or "overhead" at civil fields) would be precluded or
impractical due to weather, traffic, or local procedures. These type approaches may also be used
in conjunction with certain emergencies (i.e., in-flight damage).
2.
General. Every wide or straight-in approach will be different, depending on altitude and
aircraft position relative to the runway. These factors may be influenced by weather, traffic,
approach and/or tower controllers, etc. The pilot must use his/her judgment and experience to
adjust the aircraft's flight path and/or configuration to safely and efficiently execute the approach
and landing.
3.
Miscellaneous. It is necessary to become familiar with and understand certain terms used
in aviation not common to naval aviation. Since the racetrack landing pattern is peculiar to naval
aviation, a pilot may encounter the more common "box" pattern at a non-Navy field or any time
a non-break entry is made to any field (i.e., visual approach, instrument approach, etc.).
7-32 LANDING PROCEDURES


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