Quantcast Stalls - P-330_wch50100

 

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CHAPTER SIX
T-34C CONTACT
3.
Procedures
a.
Reduce power to 300 ft-lbs., check airspeed below 150 KIAS and lower the landing
gear.  Approaching 100 KIAS adjust power to approximately 500-550 ft-lbs. to
maintain airspeed. Initially, left rudder will be required for the power reduction, then
right and up trim as the aircraft decelerates towards 100 KIAS.
b.
When on airspeed, altitude, and heading, perform the Landing Checklist down to
flaps.
c.
Perform turns as prescribed by the instructor.
d.
Reduce power by 100 ft-lbs., check airspeed below 120 KIAS and lower full flaps.
e.
Approaching 90 KIAS, adjust power to approximately 600 ft-lbs. to maintain
airspeed.
f.
Trim will be right rudder and up elevator. Check flaps full down and report, "Gear
down, flaps down, Landing Checklist complete."
g.
Perform turns as prescribed by the instructor.
h.
Advance power to maximum allowable, check airspeed below 120 KIAS and raise
the gear and flaps. Turn landing lights off. Approaching 170 KIAS, reduce the
power to 750-800 ft-lbs.  With the initial power advancement, right rudder is
required, but as the aircraft accelerates, trim will be left rudder, down elevator.
4.
Common Errors
a.
Failure to properly trim rudder pressures, resulting in poor heading control.
b.
Commencing the Landing Checklist in the middle of a transition, resulting in poor
basic airwork.
c.
Failure to maintain proper nose attitudes associated with configuration.
d.
Failure to properly trim elevator pressure, resulting in poor altitude control.
e.
Neglecting the landing lights.
613.
STALLS
1.  Description. Stalls are taught to develop your ability to recognize a complete stall or an
approaching stall and to recover correctly with a minimum loss of altitude.
2.  General. You will learn to recognize the approaching stall or complete stall through a
combination of the senses of sight, sound and feel.
a.
Vision is useful in detecting a stall condition by noting the attitude of the airplane.
This sense can be fully relied on only when the stall is the result of an unusual
attitude of the airplane. However, since the airplane can also be stalled from a normal
attitude, vision in this instance would be of little help in detecting the approaching
stall.
6-20 FLIGHT PROCEDURES


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