Quantcast Spin - P-330_wch50110

 

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CHAPTER SIX
T-34C CONTACT
NOTE
The low-fuel warning light for the low-wing tank may illuminate
regardless of fuel state.
e.
To recover from the slip, smoothly roll the wings towards level while reducing rudder
pressure. Remember, the slip must be taken out with enough altitude remaining to
slow the rate of descent and ensure positive control of the aircraft during the final
moments of any maneuver in which it is used.
4.
Common Errors
a.
Improper application of rudder, resulting in a skid.
b.
Poor airspeed control. Remember, nose attitude still controls airspeed.
c.
Not varying angle of bank or rudder pressure to maintain desired track over ground.
d.
Rough entry and recovery control applications.
619.
SPIN
1.
Description.  Aggravate a stall until the aircraft begins a nose low autorotation.
Concentrate on cockpit indications during the spin. Once spin indications have been verified,
execute recovery procedure. When rotation stops and assured of flying speed, commence a
smooth pullout.
2.
General. Spins are taught primarily to increase your confidence in yourself and the aircraft
and improve your orientation in unusual attitudes.  In this respect, spins are an excellent
introduction to aerobatics. Practice them to the left and right. A spin is very easy to perform and
recovery can be just as easily effected. This maneuver places no excessive loads or stresses on
the aircraft when properly executed.
We practice spins for the same reason we practice stalls. Stalls and spins are not normal flight
maneuvers, but they can occur during flight and only through practice can they be recognized
rapidly, and recovered from instinctively and reflexively by making the mechanical flight control
inputs necessary for recovery.
Spins are generally performed only for air shows and training, but in WWI spins were used to
descend through a cloud layer safely. With no flight instruments, early aviators who tried to fly
through the clouds could easily get vertigo and enter a spiral dive with rapidly increasing
airspeed that (when exceeding Vne) resulted in destruction of the plane and the aviator. A
solution was to enter a spin, descend down through the clouds, and hope you had enough altitude
and visibility after breaking out to recover safely. With technology and instrumentation, this
maneuver was no longer needed to descend through a cloud layer.
An airplane is a compromise between stability and maneuverability. Modern civilian general
aviation and transport planes are designed with stability in mind, and although not spin-proof, are
usually difficult to spin and even very few modern trainers are certified for spins. Military
6-30 FLIGHT PROCEDURES


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