Quantcast Slow Flight/Minimum Control Maneuvers (SFMCM)

 

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CHAPTER SIX
T-34C CONTACT
3.
Common Errors
a.
Not completing the three Cs prior to every stall.
b.
Leaving the autoignition on after concluding all of your stall maneuvers.
614.
SLOW FLIGHT/MINIMUM CONTROL MANEUVERS (SFMCM)
1.
Description. The slow flight maneuvers are designed to develop your ability to fly the
aircraft in a near-stalled condition.
2.
General. This maneuver will be demonstrated by the instructor and then flown by the
student. Every properly executed takeoff and landing you make requires you to operate the
aircraft at low airspeed. During training, students are taught "flight at minimum controllable
airspeed" so they may learn the effect that airspeed has on aircraft performance and
controllability.
Listed below are some of the objectives for teaching flight at minimum controllable airspeed:
a.
The student will be able to recognize that the aircraft is approaching or has attained a
critically low airspeed.
b.
The student will be able to control the aircraft at airspeeds just above stall.
c.
To increase the confidence of the pilot in his ability to operate the aircraft throughout
its full range of controllability. There is more training value to the maneuver than just
showing how slow the airplane can be flown. For example, the following items will
be demonstrated and taught:
i.
Airplane attitude at minimum controllable airspeed.
ii.
Power required versus airspeed produced.
iii.
Trim needed.
iv.
Control effectiveness.
v.
Radius of turn and rate of turn compared to degree of bank.
vi.
Stall as a result of level turn.
vii. Adverse yaw.
viii. "Minimum controllable airspeed." This is not a set figure. It will vary with
aircraft weight, configuration, and power setting. It is best described as a speed
just above stall or a point at which a further reduction in airspeed, or an increase
in angle of attack or weight, will cause an immediate physical indication of a
stall. The physical indication would be rudder shakers (26.5 + units AOA),
pitch down of the nose, rolling to right or left, or reaching the limit of up
elevator travel.
6-22 FLIGHT PROCEDURES


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