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CHAPTER SIX
T-34C CONTACT CHG 2, CHG 3
4.
Common Errors
a.
Failure to hold the nose in the landing attitude, thus delaying or not obtaining a stalled
condition, (i.e., letting the nose fall through).
b.
Failure to maintain angle of bank during the entry. The aircraft will have a tendency
to continue rolling past 30 angle of bank. In addition, with increasing angle of bank,
the nose will have a tendency to drop.
c.
Releasing instead of relaxing backstick pressure, or applying forward stick pressure
on recovery, thus resulting in a nose low attitude and excessive altitude loss.
d.
Not relaxing backstick pressure enough, causing the aircraft to remain stalled.
e.
Cycling rudders in an attempt to keep the ball centered before flying speed is attained.
f.
Delay in raising the nose to the recovery attitude to stop the altitude loss.
g.
Allowing aircraft to accelerate to 90 KIAS before a climb is established.
h.
Failure to add sufficient power on recovery.
617.
SKIDDED TURN STALL
1.
Description. This maneuver demonstrates the excessive loss of altitude and the unusual
characteristics of a stall in unbalanced flight. This maneuver will not be performed by the
student.
2.
General. The Skidded Turn Stall (STS) may occur in either a right or left, power-on or
power-off landing approach. One possible scenario occurs in a turn to final during an emergency
landing pattern approach while appropriately configured for the landing site. If above the ELP
profile, a slip will be required to position the aircraft back on profile. However, improper slip
inputs can result in a skid and possible stall at an altitude from which safe recovery is impossible.
Another possible scenario occurs in a turn to final during an ELP approach appropriately
configured for the landing site. If below profile, the student may incorrectly attempt to use
excessive rudder to turn the aircraft and raise the nose slightly to stretch the glide. Again, this
may very easily result in a stall at low altitude from which a safe recovery is impossible. This
stall occurs at a much higher airspeed than a stall in balanced flight. A stall that occurs in
unbalanced flight is also accompanied by a pronounced roll.
This demonstration will illustrate how quickly and unexpectedly an inverted attitude may result.
This inverted attitude, plus the fact that the stall is most likely to occur very near the ground,
should impress to the student the importance of avoiding this situation. To avoid improper slip
inputs, students shall report, "____ wing down, top rudder", prior to slip entry.
3.
Procedures
a.
CONFIGURATION: Position the aircraft at or above 8,000 feet AGL; 100 KIAS,
level flight, gear down, flaps up, Landing Checklist complete.
b.
CHECKLIST: Perform the Stall Checklist aloud.
6-28 FLIGHT PROCEDURES


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