Quantcast Procedures - P-330_wch50192

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Procedures
Back | Up | Next

Click here for thousands of PDF manuals

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Logistics
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
   
   

 



CHAPTER ELEVEN
T-34C CONTACT
2.
General. The Wingover will develop your ability to smoothly control the aircraft in
balanced flight through constantly changing attitudes and airspeeds. It is a slow and gentle
maneuver when properly executed. No abrupt control movements are necessary. The maneuver
may be initiated in either direction and is always performed in a series of two. You should
therefore complete the series on the same heading that the first Wingover was initiated. Flying
the maneuver in series will enable you to develop a "feel" for the changing control pressures and
the rhythm of the maneuver. Successive Wingovers, when continued without interruption, serve
as clearing turns for the next series.
When your instructor first demonstrates the Wingover, it is of primary importance that you
acquire a mental picture of the path through which the aircraft is flying. Notice the appearance
of the nose and the wings in relation to the ground and the horizon at various points during the
maneuver. Once you are able to visualize this, the Wingover is merely a matter of flying the
aircraft in balanced flight through this pattern. Since you are learning to fly the aircraft in a
predetermined pattern, keep your scan primarily outside of the cockpit. Use your instruments
only for an occasional reference to crosscheck your sensory impressions.
The rate of roll should be constant throughout the maneuver. The nose should always move at a
constant rate in relation to the horizon as it describes arcs, first above and then below the
horizon. Remember that in turns to the right, torque and slipstream effect must be offset with a
greater amount of rudder input than in turns to the left. Proper performance of the maneuver
demands smooth coordination of control pressures to maintain balanced flight. The rate of pitch
and roll during the Wingover is relatively slow, therefore the resultant increased G-loading is
relatively slight. It should not be necessary to exceed 2.0 Gs at any time during the maneuver.
3.
Procedures
a.
CONFIGURATION: Transition to aerobatic cruise. CHECKLIST: Complete the
Aerobatic Checklist. CLEARING TURN: Commence a clearing turn and roll out
on or parallel to a section line. Pick a prominent reference point on the horizon 90 to
either side of the nose, in the direction you intend to perform the maneuver.
b.
Recheck the wings level and clear the airspace above you. Just prior to entry, check
and report the entry altitude over the ICS. Commence the maneuver by smoothly
raising the nose while keeping the wings level. As the exhaust stacks pass the
horizon, start a roll towards the 90 checkpoint. Control the pitch and roll rate so as
to reach 45 nose up and 45 AOB simultaneously. The aircraft's heading should also
have changed approximately 45 at this point.
c.
Continue to roll towards 90 AOB as the nose inscribes an arcing path downward
towards the horizon. Maintain orientation by concentrating on your outside reference
points. Control the pitch and roll rate so as to arrive at 90 AOB with the nose
aligned with the 90 reference point. Airspeed should be approximately 90 KIAS at
this point. Do not exceed 90 AOB.
11-6 AEROBATIC MANUEVERS


Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
6230 Stone Rd, Unit Q Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 493-0744
Google +