Quantcast Performance - P-330_wch50040

 

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CHAPTER THREE
T-34C CONTACT
4.
Primary Control Application. The following will always be true in controlled flight,
regardless of the airplane's attitude in relation to the earth:
a.
When backpressure is applied to the elevator control, the airplane's nose rises in
relation to the pilot.
b.
When forward pressure is applied to the elevator control, the airplane's nose lowers in
relation to the pilot.
c.
When right pressure is applied to the aileron control, the airplane's right wing lowers
in relation to the pilot.
d.
When left pressure is applied to the aileron control, the airplane's left wing lowers in
relation to the pilot.
e.
When pressure is applied to the right rudder pedal, the airplane's nose moves to the
right in relation to the pilot.
f.
When pressure is applied to the left rudder pedal, the airplane's nose moves to the left
in relation to the pilot.
5.   Performance. Most basic airwork problems result from the student's inability to see and
control the aircraft's attitude properly. Only when the student has mastered attitude control can
he/she progress to making proper corrections. Remember this simple formula:
POWER + ATTITUDE = PERFORMANCE
The preceding explanations should prevent the beginning pilot from thinking in terms of "up" or
"down" in respect to the earth, which is only a relative state to the pilot. It will also make
understanding of the functions of the controls much easier, particularly when performing steep
banked turns and the more advanced maneuvers. Consequently, the pilot must be able to
properly determine the control application required to place the airplane in any attitude or flight
condition that is desired.
Coordinated use of ALL controls is extremely important in any turn. Applying aileron pressure
is necessary to place the airplane in the desired angle of bank, while simultaneous application of
rudder pressure is required to counteract the resultant adverse yaw. During a turn, the angle of
attack must be increased by application of elevator pressure because more lift is required than
when in straight-and-level flight. The steeper the turn, the more back elevator pressure is
needed.
After the bank and turn are established, the airplane may continue in a constant turn when all
pressure on the ailerons and rudder is released, or it may require some opposite aileron to prevent
the bank angle from increasing. It may also require continued aileron pressure in the direction of
turn to prevent returning to the wings-level attitude. This will be discussed in more detail in the
chapter on Flight Procedures.
3-4
USE AND EFFECT OF CONTROLS


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