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T-34C CONTACT
CHAPTER NINE
Once you have properly taken care of your aircraft, call the FDO commercial collect
or DSN and advise them of your situation. Be sure to use a fireguard for restarting
the aircraft. Solos may not practice spins, stalls, simulated engine failures, PPELs, or
any maneuver which has not been previously introduced. Solo launch time is no
earlier than sunrise with RDO on station. Solo recovery is no later than 30 minutes
prior to official sunset.
b.
High work. Conform to local course rules and remain oriented. It is recommended
that you practice high work in sight of an easily identifiable landmark.  Check
between maneuvers to see where you are and perform gas/position reports to yourself
while operating in the working area. You should be monitoring the area common
frequency, as well as the guard frequency in the event of a solo recall. Take time to
practice maneuvers which you need to perfect. Keep your scan moving outside for
other aircraft in the same operating area.
c.
Operations at Outlying Fields. Ensure that you know the radio frequency and
pattern altitude of the OLF you are about to enter. Utilize the Proper Entry and
Communications procedures for the OLF. Know the proper pattern direction and use
extra care in establishing interval. You should also keep track of your flight time and
number of landings accomplished at the OLF. When it is time to depart, follow
applicable course rules and check your gear up.
d.
Emergencies. In all emergencies, the first consideration is to fly the aircraft. Then,
determine the situation and your course of action in accordance with NATOPS.
Should the emergency you are experiencing require a forced landing, it is imperative
that you level your wings prior to impact to avoid a possible "cartwheeling"
condition. Lastly, communicate and let others know your situation.
i.
Lost aircraft.  If you get lost, admit it and try to communicate using all
available channels and NAV aids. Be prepared to give a long count (i.e., 12
34567 8910987654321) or short count (i.e., 123454
321) in the event of a lost plane search. Land at a suitable airfield before you
run out of gas. The best policy is to remain oriented and do not get lost. If you
actually get lost, it will be necessary for you to use your own initiative and good
judgment.  Every situation will be different; therefore, it is impossible to
establish a criterion that will apply to every set of circumstances. However, the
following items, known as the five "Cs" will generally apply: CONFESS,
CLIMB, COMMUNICATE, CONSERVE, AND COMPLY.
(a)
CONFESS - Admit that your are lost and need some form of assistance.
(b)
CLIMB - Ceiling and visibility permitting, climb to improve radio
reception and forward visibility.
(c)
COMMUNICATE - Request assistance on the area working frequency
from an instructor pilot or advice from your FDO/ODO. If unable, try
calling Approach Control frequency with a PAN report and request
vectors to homefield. If unable to receive any reply, switch radio and try
again on GUARD frequency. A sample PAN report follows: "PAN-PAN,
PAN-PAN, PAN-PAN, [Call sign] is lost, request vectors to homefield."
SOLO FLIGHT: CONTACT 4401 9-3


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