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T-34C CONTACT
CHAPTER SIX
is evident, adding maximum (allowable) power while maintaining proper spin
recovery controls will enhance recovery from an erect steady spin in either direction.
Spin recoveries using anti-spin controls and power will not appreciably increase rate
of descent while maintaining a stalled AOA; however, significant altitude loss and
airspeed increase will result on spin recovery. Power application to recover from
spins should be used in emergency situations only. Upon recovery, controls should
be neutralized expeditiously and power reduced to idle to minimize altitude loss and
rapid airspeed buildup.
3.
Inverted Spins
WARNING
Intentional inverted spins are PROHIBITED.
Inverted spins are difficult to achieve and easily recoverable. Pro-spin controls (full rudder
deflection and full forward stick) must be applied following an inverted stall to induce a spin.
The inverted spin characteristics are quite similar to erect spin characteristics with the exception
of angle of attack and normal acceleration. The angle of attack indicates two to three units AOA,
airspeed will indicate zero and the load factor will be approximately -1.0 "G." Due to the
unusual aircraft attitude required to enter an inverted spin and the initial spin gyrations, inverted
spin direction is easily misinterpreted by the pilot when relying on outside reference alone. The
cockpit turn needle deflects fully in the direction of spin, erect or inverted, and is the only
reliable indicator of spin direction.  To recover from an inverted spin refer to the T-34C
NATOPS Manual, section V, OUT-OF-CONTROL RECOVERY.
4.
Miscellaneous
As good as the spin characteristics of the T-34C are, do not take the aircraft for granted. Always
be prepared to bail out if necessary. If a spin just will not recover after ensuring recovery
controls are properly applied and power is increased, it is time to bail out. Do not waste time
when you have made your bailout decision. If you have not recovered by 5000 feet (remember
the 1000 foot lag on the altimeter) and you decide to bail out at that altitude, you are extremely
time limited as the aircraft will impact the ground in about 30 seconds. Observations during the
KIWI bailout trainer show it takes 12 to 15 seconds to get out of the aircraft and that would put
you clearing the aircraft at about 2500 feet. Bail out to the outside of the spin (opposite the turn
needle deflection) towards the trailing edge of the wing. If you end up sitting or lying on the
wing and the lack of airflow does not sweep you clear of the aircraft, do not crawl 15 feet to the
wingtip. Rather, go two feet to the trailing edge to get in the relative airflow that should separate
you from the aircraft.  This may happen due to the high AOA creating a dead space of
undisturbed air on top of the wing.
Overall, the T-34C is a good spinning aircraft. Know the capabilities, limitations, and proper
NATOPS recovery procedures for the aircraft for spins and out-of-control situations, and the spin
training you receive during your training command tour will be fun and rewarding for both
instructors and students.
FLIGHT PROCEDURES 6-33


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