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CHAPTER EIGHT
T-34C CONTACT
803.
HIGH ALTITUDE POWER LOSS
1.
Description. The SIMULATED High Altitude Power Loss (HAPL) will be initiated
above 2500 feet AGL by the instructor reducing power to idle and informing the student he has
a simulated power loss. The HAPL may occur at any airspeed and configuration. Fly to
intercept the ELP profile while simultaneously executing the appropriate procedures.
2.
General. Power losses may be caused by engine seizure, flameout, or malfunction of the
pneumatic sensing system of the fuel control unit resulting in a "rollback." In the last case, the
pilot may restore power by utilizing the Emergency Power Lever (see paragraph 808) enabling
him to execute a PEL at a paved field. However, if power cannot be restored, execution of the
HAPL procedures will be required when above 2500 feet AGL.
The SIMULATED High Altitude Power Loss will closely resemble the actual characteristics of
the aircraft with a "dead" engine and feathered propeller. The glide ratio and rate of descent
will be very similar to the actual engine failure, as well as the nose attitude required for the
100-knot power-off glide.
An alert pilot is constantly on the lookout for suitable landing fields in the event of an actual
emergency. Naturally, the best landing site is an established airfield. This should be your first
consideration during any emergency. The next best substitute is a hard-packed, long (5000 feet
or more) and smooth field with no obstructions (trees, power lines, etc.) on the approach end,
but these fields are not always readily available. You must be prepared to select the best field
and, if you have been conducting your gas and position reports, this should not be a difficult
task. Cultivated fields are usually good as are plowed fields when landing with the furrows.
Try to avoid small, rough fields containing boulders, ditches, trees, cattle, trailers or other
obstructions. When nothing is available, altitude permitting, you will have to bail out.
Remember that your bailout option expires at 1200 feet AGL (low key). If bailout is not
possible or feasible, and there is no field available, landing on the tops of trees and settling
down is your last recourse. If no field is available and you are near a large body of water,
ditching near shore is preferable to landing in the trees. In all cases, however, good headwork
will make the difference between success and failure.
Always be aware of the direction and velocity of the wind if possible. Wind direction may be
determined by several methods. Other than a windsock or tetrahedron at an established field,
the best indication of the wind is blowing smoke. If smoke rises for a short distance and then
abruptly flares out close to the earth in a straight line parallel to the ground, the velocity near
the surface will be fairly high. Blowing dust is another good indicator. If you are unable to
determine the wind direction or velocity, use your last known wind or duty runway from your
departure airport.
NOTE
Distractions resulting from excessive troubleshooting or time-
consuming attempts to regain power during the execution of the ELP
may cause substantial deviation from the standard pattern,
precluding a safe landing at the selected site.
8-6 EMERGENCY PROCEDURES


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