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CHAPTER SIXTEEN
T-34C CONTACT
4.
"I MUST LAND IMMEDIATELY" - If it becomes necessary to make an immediate
landing and you have no radios, signal to the aircraft that joins up with you by using your
flashlight. With a lighted flashlight pointed directly towards the other aircraft, rotate the light in
a circular motion similar to your signal to the lineman for start.
1603. NIGHT PRECAUTIONARY EMERGENCY LANDING
The night PPEL is flown with the same checkpoints and airspeeds as the day PPEL (see
NATOPS and Chapter Eight). Aircraft will fly to high key at 2500 feet AGL, wingtip distance
abeam the intended point of landing (the first one-third of the runway).
At high key, make your voice report and turn towards low key using angle of bank as necessary,
passing over the runway at approximately 2000 feet AGL.  At low key, 1200 feet AGL,
momentarily level your wings on the attitude gyro and check for a ⅔ wingtip distance (the
middle aileron hinge). Ensure landing lights are on by low key. Landing lights will be used for
all night PPEL training. Report low key in accordance with course rules. Turn towards the 90
position and proceed with your PPEL procedures as in the daytime.
1604. ELECTRICAL POWER FAILURE
Electrical power is of great importance at night because of the need for interior and exterior
lighting, two-way communications, navigational equipment, flight instruments, and landing gear
and flaps. An aircraft with no electrical power is virtually invisible at night. In this case, it is
only the pilot who can maintain his own aircraft separation. For our purposes, we will discuss
only two types of electrical failure: generator failure and complete electrical failure.
1.
Generator Failure. If the generator becomes inoperative, the indications will be a flashing
master caution light, a generator annunciator light, an ammeter discharging, a voltmeter reading
24 volts or less, and a slight dimming of cockpit lights when the voltage drops from 28 volts to
below 24 volts. Perform the appropriate NATOPS procedures. If you are unable to reset the
generator, then the primary consideration is to conserve battery power.  The following
procedures shall apply to the appropriate situation.
a.
Landing Pattern. If unable to reset the generator while in the landing pattern, call
for a full stop, stating difficulty and the next time around the pattern, execute a full-
stop landing.
NOTE
Remember that with the exterior lights off, only the pilot can maintain
aircraft separation. You will be invisible to other aircraft. Also, with
both battery and generator off, your pitot static instruments (airspeed
indicator, altimeter, VSI) and wet compass will still function. Engine
instruments that will also function are ITT, N1, and prop RPM. The
attitude gyro, caution panel, RMI, turn and bank, torque, fuel flow,
fuel quantity, oil pressure and oil temperature indicators will not
operate.
16-2 NIGHT EMERGENCY PROCEDURES


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