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T-34C CONTACT
CHAPTER SEVEN
708.
CROSSWIND APPROACH
1.
Description. Compensate for crosswinds in the landing approach with power and angle of
bank to maintain the normal track over the ground.
2.
General
a.
Background. Many runways or landing areas are such that landings must be made
while the wind is blowing across rather than parallel to the landing direction;
therefore, all pilots should be prepared to cope with these situations when they arise.
The same basic principles and factors involved in a normal approach and landing
apply to a crosswind approach and landing. Only the additional techniques required
for correcting for wind drift are discussed here.
There are two usual methods of accomplishing a crosswind approach and landing the
crab method, and the wing-low method. Although the crab method may be easier for
the pilot to maintain during final approach, it requires a high degree of judgment and
timing in removing the crab immediately prior to touchdown to avoid side loads on
the landing gear. The wing-low method is recommended in most cases, although a
combination of both methods may be used later in your career. Only the wing-low
method will be utilized during your landings in the T-34C.
b.
Execution. The power setting and angle of bank used at the start of the approach are
compatible with an "average" condition. This "average" condition is a day when the
wind is 5-10 knots and nearly parallel to the landing line. Under these conditions, the
initial approach turn will utilize 15-20 degrees of bank and the power setting will be
reduced in small increments in order to maintain the prescribed glideslope. However,
as wind conditions vary, it will be necessary during the approach to vary the angle of
bank, power setting, or both in order to arrive at the landing line with 1200-1500 feet
of straightaway, 100-150 feet of altitude and the proper airspeed.
Prevailing crosswinds are normally broken down into two categories according to
how they will affect the aircraft on the landing approach. They are referred to as
either "overshooting" or "undershooting" crosswinds. The "overshooting crosswind"
will cause the aircraft to fly a track outside the normal path over ground on final. The
"undershooting crosswind" will cause the aircraft to fly a track inside the normal path
over the ground on final. (Figures 7-12 and 7-13).
In order to maintain a particular track or desired path over ground, it will be necessary
to "crab" or head into the wind slightly.
FLIGHT PROCEDURES 6-23


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