Quantcast Common Errors - P-330_wch50190

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Common Errors
Back | Up | Next

Click here for thousands of PDF manuals

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Logistics
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
   
   

 



CHAPTER ELEVEN
T-34C CONTACT
AGSM. Quickly scan the altimeter during recovery in order to return to straight and
level flight at approximately the same altitude, airspeed and heading from which the
maneuver was initiated.
4.
Common Errors
a.
Failure to check and report the altitude prior to entry. It is hard to recover on the
same altitude when you do not know what it is.
b.
Poor directional control caused by failure to maintain balanced flight with the proper
amount of right rudder as airspeed is lost and then regained. Poor rudder control is
easily detected by checking the alignment of the nose and the section line.
Remember that the required rudder input varies as airspeed varies. Almost constant
rudder adjustment will be required during the maneuver.
c.
Poor directional control caused by failure to keep the wings parallel to the horizon
throughout the maneuver. The most common tendency by far is to pull the stick
slightly to the right when pulling the nose up during the 3.5 G entry. Keep the stick
centered longitudinally as the entry input is made. Check and correct the wing
attitude often.
d.
Poor execution of the initial pull-up with respect to G loading and/or timing.
Remember, 3.5 Gs in two to three seconds. Scan the accelerometer. Excessive G-
loading and/or loading the aircraft too quickly will cause an excessively rapid
deceleration, and may result in overstress. Insufficient G-loading, or taking too long
to obtain the correct acceleration, will deplete the aircraft's energy state, resulting in a
stalled or near-stalled condition when approaching the inverted position.
e.
Relaxing too much backstick pressure while passing through the inverted position at
he top of the Loop. This will result in a "floating" sensation. Remember to maintain
some positive G-loading throughout the entire maneuver. Conversely, failure to relax
sufficient backstick pressure over the top will result in excessive angle of attack and
rudder shakers. If this occurs, relax the backstick pressure slightly.
f.
Failure to initiate the pull-out soon enough during the second half of the Loop. This
results in excessive airspeed and recovery below the initial altitude.
11-4 AEROBATIC MANUEVERS


Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

Integrated Publishing, Inc.