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T-34C CONTACT CHG 5
CHAPTER EIGHT
CHAPTER EIGHT
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
800.
INTRODUCTION
This chapter forms the basis of your T-34C Emergency Procedures Training. A complete and
thorough knowledge of the procedures in this chapter is essential for students who wish to
progress to their solo flight. The memorization and proficient execution of these procedures
will prove to be one of the greatest challenges to you during Primary Training. Remember,
however, the single most important factor in the execution of any emergency procedure is to
first maintain control of the aircraft.  After the aircraft is under control you must then
determine the precise nature of the problem. It is only at this point that you can execute the
applicable emergency procedure and determine the appropriate landing criteria. No matter
how well you know your procedures, if you lose control of the aircraft or misdiagnose the
nature of the malfunction, you will not be successful in handling the emergency. Make sure
that you are in control of the aircraft and understand what the problem is before you attempt to
apply a solution.
1.
Description. N/A
2.
General. It is conceivable that during any flight evolution, an engine or system
malfunction may occur either while on the ground or in flight. These malfunctions can range
from system failures to complete power losses. All emergencies or malfunctions will be
handled in accordance with NATOPS procedures, utilizing aircrew coordination skills. Power
losses fall into two main categories:
a.
Those that occur without warning.
b.
Those that present ample warning.
The first step in any emergency is to maintain control of the aircraft. Do not assume the
Instructor Pilot is flying until he/she has verbally taken the controls. The second step is to
correctly analyze the situation and announce the malfunction. Lastly, take the appropriate
corrective action. Instructors should pre-brief certain items regarding who will fly during an
emergency and what kind of assistance will be required from the pilot not at the controls.
The instant failure generally occurs due to fuel starvation and, dependent upon altitude, may
require immediate response. Impending engine problems may be prefaced by loss of oil
pressure, excessive ITT, fluctuating N1 or prop RPM, vibrations, etc. These may be classified
as deferred emergencies requiring action to prevent catastrophic failure. This chapter will
show the actions to be taken by the pilot in the event that the engine fails to operate as
designed.
The Emergency Landing Pattern (ELP) will be utilized for both the impending engine failure
and the immediate power loss. A different set of procedures will be required to execute the
Precautionary Emergency Landing (PEL), High Altitude Power Loss (HAPL) and Low
Altitude Power Loss (LAPL). However, the ELP profile will be flown for all three of the
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES 8-1


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