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CHAPTER SIXTEEN
NIGHT EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
1600. INTRODUCTION
The Emergency procedures for the T-34C are outlined in the T-34C NATOPS Manual and the
T-34C NATOPS Pocket Checklist and are applicable for day and night operations. Refer also to
Chapter Eight of this FTI; Daytime Emergency procedures apply to Night Contact. This section
on emergency procedures will discuss the additional considerations to existing emergency
procedures.
1601. ENGINE FAILURES
While engine failures are rare and usually occur only if flameout or fuel flow fails,
considerations must be made for them when operating at night.
1.
Engine Failure at or above 2000 feet AGL. If an engine failure occurs at altitude,
attempt an engine restart if applicable. If the restart is not attempted or is unsuccessful, and a
lighted runway is not immediately available, abandoning the aircraft (BAILOUT) is highly
recommended.  Refer to the NATOPS Flight Manual, section V or the NATOPS Pocket
Checklist.
2.
Engine Failure below 2000 feet AGL.  If the engine fails below 2000 feet AGL
(minimum recommended night bailout altitude), abandoning the aircraft is not recommended. If
a lighted runway is not immediately available, NATOPS does not specify what action should be
taken. Therefore, expeditious headwork will dictate what action should be taken. If the engine
failure occurs close to 2000 feet AGL, a decision to bail out should be made quickly to allow
sufficient time for egress. In any case, DO NOT SECURE THE BATTERY.
NOTE
Remember, airspeed can be exchanged for altitude.
1602. VISUAL AIRCRAFT-TO-AIRCRAFT SIGNALS
In the event of lost communications, it is necessary to have standard visual aircraft-to-aircraft
signals.
1.
"FOLLOW ME" - If another aircraft joins on you, turns its external lights off and on
several times, and then continues ahead of you, this means "follow me."
2.
"CONTINUE ON COURSE" - While following another aircraft as described above, it
turns its external lights off and on several times and breaks away sharply to the RIGHT, this
means "continue on course."
3.
"ORBIT THIS POSITION" - If the aircraft you are following turns its external lights on
and off several times and then breaks sharply to the LEFT, this means "orbit this position."
Establish an orbit and remain there until the aircraft again joins up and signals to follow.
NIGHT EMERGENCY PROCEDURES 16-1


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