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APPENDIX C
T-34C CONTACT
a.
Landing Pattern.  Major troubleshooting of radio/ICS systems and resetting of
transponders will not be performed in the landing pattern. Make normal calls "in the
blind," exercise extreme caution, and perform a full-stop landing. Taxi clear of the
runway on the first available taxiway/off-duty runway once the aircraft has
decelerated to safe ground taxi speed.
b.
Training Area. After troubleshooting confirms the radio has failed and assuming
VFR weather at homefield:
i.
Squawk 7600.
ii.
Change UHF channels to Approach/Tower and make radio calls "in the blind."
iii.
Consider using the VHF or PRC-90.
iv.
Make homefield entry per local Lost Comm procedures.
6.
Loss of Visual Contact with Flight. If a Formation flight, refer to local operations.
7.
Downed Pilot and Aircraft.
a.
If we are the first on the scene of an aircraft mishap, we will assume on-scene
command of the accident site until properly relieved, we reach a bingo fuel state or
have any emergency of our own. We will guide in the SAR aircraft, assessing the
status of the crew and aircraft, and directing the SAR effort as outlined by the
published On-Scene Commander Checklist.
b.
Discuss basic responsibilities of each crewmember.
8.
Aircraft Emergencies and System Failures. Will be handled per NATOPS procedures.
In a broad sense, EPs are categorized into immediate action or deferred PEL type emergencies.
a.
Simulated emergencies will be prefaced with the word "simulated."
b.
Power losses must be quickly analyzed to determine whether prop feathering is
appropriate. For example, we will try not to confuse the occurrence of a "rollback" or
compressor stall as a flameout or frozen turbine. This is sometimes briefed as "no
fast hands in the cockpit," designed to remind the crew that a wrong action may
actually make matters worse.
c.
Fire warning lights will be confirmed with secondary indications prior to engine
shutdown.
9.
Bailout. Occurrences that would warrant bailout must be compared against actual altitude,
noting that we can trade excess airspeed for altitude:
a.
Engine failure without a landing site.
b.
Airborne fires that will not extinguish.
c.
Uncontrolled flight below 5000 feet AGL (spins/ATS, etc.).
d.
Midair collision with severe damage and uncontrollable aircraft.
e.
Minimum recommended altitudes are: 1200 feet AGL Day VMC 2000 feet AGL Night
or IMC 5000 feet AGL Out-of-control.
C-6
THE NATOPS BRIEF


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