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CHAPTER THREE
INSTRUMENT FLIGHT RULES WORKBOOK
311. APPLICABLE RULES FROM OPNAV 3710.7
OPNAV 3710.7 series has established rules governing Navy/Marine Corps pilots on instrument
approaches. (review Chapter Five of OPNAV 3710.7). A T34C with an instructor and a
student is considered to be a single-piloted aircraft. According to OPNAV 3710.7 series, a
single-piloted aircraft cannot commence an instrument approach (for landing) if the actual
weather is below the weather minimums published for that approach. However, once the
approach has been commenced, a pilot may continue the approach to the DH/MDA even if the
reported weather goes below published minimums.
Another restriction placed on single-piloted aircraft concerns minimums. The absolute
minimums for a single-piloted aircraft executing an instrument approach are 200 foot ceiling and
height above touchdown (HAT) and visibility 1/2 statute mile or 2400 feet RVR.
For example, when executing a PAR approach which has a decision height of 126 feet MSL and
a HAT of 100 feet, 100 feet must be added to your decision height so you do not descend below
200 feet AGL. The weather required would also be increased to at least 200 foot ceiling.
Visibility must also be statute mile or 2400 feet of RVR, depending upon which unit of
measure is used for the approach.
What is the Decision Height and Weather required for a single-piloted aircraft executing a PAR
approach at Pensacola NAS for:
Decision Ht
Ceiling-Visibility
* RWY 7R
* RWY 25R
* RWY 19
(Answers on next page)
312. PRACTICE APPROACHES
Although the pilot of a single-piloted aircraft cannot commence an approach if the reported
weather is below minimums, he may accept a clearance for a practice approach at an airport that
is not the filed destination or alternate, if a landing is not intended. The weather at the filed
destination and alternate must meet the IFR filing criteria for filing an IFR flight plan as set forth
in OPNAV 3710.7.
Can the pilot of a single-piloted aircraft request a clearance for a practice approach at the
intended destination if the weather at the field is reported to be below minimums for the
approach intended? ........NO
Can the pilot make a practice approach at the destination if the weather is reported to be above
the minimums for the approach?........YES
3-10 INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROCEDURES


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