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CHAPTER FOUR
Flight Weather Briefing Form, DD Form 175-1
400.
INTRODUCTION
In general, military aviators are required to submit an appropriate flight plan to the local air
traffic control facility for all flights by using the DD 175 Military Flight Plan. The only
exceptions allowed are use of the daily flight schedule, FAA Flight Plan, or an international
flight plan. Since most training flights will use the daily flight plan, you may not learn about the
DD 175 in detail until the instrument flight rules course. However, this flight plan will be the
type­other than the daily flight schedule­used most often for military flights. Thus, it provides a
realistic background for the introduction of its counterpart, the DD 175-1, the Flight Weather
Briefing Form.
When embarking on flights outside the local area, you will most likely be required to file a DD
175. Flights of this nature also require an increased amount of preflight planning, as these flights
tend to be unique, one-time events. While this provides aviators with a great deal of latitude in
the selection of routes, it also increases the requirements for ensuring the plan includes sufficient
alternative courses of action. Naturally, one of the major areas that require planning for
alternatives is the weather.
This last chapter introduces a simple flight plan for which you will need a weather brief. For
most situations, the local meteorology office will provide this briefing, but there may be
situations when the pilot may need to fill out the DD 175-1, such as when overseas, or when
conducting a telephone briefing. In all situations, though, the aircrew will need to take an active
part in the process of determining the weather. In marginal weather conditions, aircrew will
check the weather before planning, before submitting the planned flight, before takeoff, and
during the flight.
The aircrew should review the weather and build an overall picture prior to the formal weather
brief by a meteorologist. In this manner, aircrew will have more time to consider how the
weather conditions may affect their flight, and they will be better prepared to ask questions of the
briefer, enabling a two-way conversation to occur. While meteorologists are certainly the most
knowledgeable source for weather information, the aircrew is the most knowledgeable about
their mission. The briefer can best prepare the aircrew for their flight only when aviators ask
questions during the briefing about areas they would like further information or explanation.
401.
LESSON TOPIC LEARNING OBJECTIVES
TERMINAL OBJECTIVE: Partially supported by this lesson topic:
4.0 Describe indicated data on the DD 175-1, "Flight Weather Briefing Form," and state the
sources of hazardous weather information used to complete the form.
FLIGHT WEATHER BRIEFING FORM, DD FORM 175-1 4-1


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