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CHAPTER THREE
Severe Weather Watches, Military Advisories, and PIREPs
300.
INTRODUCTION
While the weather products described in the previous two chapters presented the means of
determining basic present and forecast weather conditions, this chapter introduces the systems for
dissemination of weather warnings, watches, and advisories. When aviators begin their flight
planning routine, checking for any severe weather should be the very first step. Changes to
missions are a commonplace occurrence due to quickly changing weather conditions, and new
aviators will soon appreciate the ability to plan around the weather, when able.
As might be expected, the Severe Weather Watch, Military Weather Advisory, and In-Flight Weather
Advisories pass massive amounts of critical weather information to a variety of civil and military
stations, and every aviator needs a solid foundation in the understanding of these messages. This can
be possible only via a thorough understanding of the fundamentals of weather mechanics and related
hazards to aviation. Additionally, a great deal of information regarding severe weather can only be
gathered through Pilot Weather Reports, especially when operating over less-populated areas or
overseas. Again, this necessitates that aviators have a solid understanding of weather phenomena
and reporting systems.
All of the severe weather watches, warnings, and advisories are transmitted in text, or teletype,
format. Additionally, some are available in both text and graphic, or facsimile format. As
technology advances, more and more of the text weather messages are transformed by computer and
available as graphic images. Some are even available in plain-language translations over the Internet.
Still, the message format presented here will be used for a number of years to come, as brevity and
accuracy continue to be paramount in ensuring timeliness of distribution to the greatest number of
stations.
301.
LESSON TOPIC LEARNING OBJECTIVES
TERMINAL OBJECTIVE: Partially supported by this lesson topic:
3.0 Describe displayed data on Severe Weather Watches, Military Weather Advisories, and In-
Flight Weather Advisories, and state the importance of Pilot Reports (PIREPs).
ENABLING OBJECTIVES: Completely supported by this lesson topic:
3.1 State the Severe Weather Watch's two-letter teletype identifier.
3.2 State the requirements for issuing a Severe Weather Watch.
3.3 Read and identify data on a Severe Weather Watch message.
SEVERE WEATHER WATCHES, MILITARY ADVISORIES, AND PIREPS
3-1


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