Quantcast Figure 4-7. Cross Section of a Microburst

 

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CHAPTER FOUR
AVIATION WEATHER
Figure 4-6 Vortex Ring of a Microburst
Figure 4-7 Cross Section of a Microburst
The wind shear created by microbursts is extremely dangerous to aircraft during the takeoff,
approach, and go-around phases of flight. Not all microbursts are associated with thunderstorms.
Microbursts are possible with any rain shower, even if the rain isn't reaching the ground (virga).
In Figure 4-8, the aircraft at position 1 has entered a microburst. At this point, the crew may
notice an increased angle of attack as the aircraft enters the upward flow of the vortex ring.
Once inside the microburst, the aircraft will experience a strong increase in headwind, with a
resulting increase in indicated airspeed and lift, which will cause the aircraft to pitch up (position
2). A natural reaction of the pilot would be to reduce power and apply nose down stick force.
This would correct the situation if the aircraft was not in a microburst, and would appear to work
4-8
Thunderstorms


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