Quantcast Figure 4.1-1 The Polar Perspective

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Figure 4.1-1 The Polar Perspective
Back | Up | Next

Click here for thousands of PDF manuals

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Logistics
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
   
   

 



Every point on the surface of the earth can be defined by a specific latitude (angular
distance north or south of the equator) and by a specific longitude (angular distance east
or west of the Prime Meridian) (Figure 4.1-1). Lines of latitude are also called parallels,
while lines of longitude can be referred to as meridians.
Figure 4.1-1 The Polar Perspective
Since they are angular distances, latitude and longitude are measured in degrees and
minutes. There are 60 minutes in each degree. Latitude, starting at the equator, is
measured from 0 to 90 degrees and labeled North or South. Longitude, starting at the
prime meridian (0 Longitude), is measured from 0 to 180 degrees and labeled East or
West, and ends at the International Date Line (180 Longitude).
In Figure 4.1-2, NAS Pensacola is located at 30 degrees, 21 minutes north latitude; and
087 degrees, 19 minutes west longitude. This position would be written as: 30 22'N, 087
19'W. (Note: Always read latitude first and use 3 digits for longitude to avoid confusion)
4.6-10


Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
6230 Stone Rd, Unit Q Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 493-0744
Google +